Jacques Audiard, Rust and Bone, 2012, color film in 35 mm, 120 minutes. Production still. Ali and Stéphanie (Matthias Schoenaerts and Marion Cotillard).


TO PARAPHRASE OSCAR WILDE, one must have a heart of stone to watch Jacques Audiard’s outrageous melodrama Rust and Bone without laughing; the Palme d’Or contender is just as ludicrous as its description suggests. Very loosely based on Craig Davidson’s short-story collection of the same name, the sixth film by Audiard, who was last in Competition with A Prophet (2009), stars Marion Cotillard as Stéphanie, a whale trainer in Antibes who becomes a double amputee after a freak accident at the marine mammal park where she works. (Is the whale that errantly lands on the platform where Stéphanie choreographs the massive sea creatures violently protesting against having to perform to Katy Perry’s “Firework”?) She is ministered to by Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts), a taurine bouncer she met at a club a few weeks prior to her calamity; he carries her in and out of the Mediterranean on his back. Their relationship deepens—so much so that Stéphanie, now fitted with prosthetic legs, becomes Ali’s manager at his amateur ultimate-fighting bouts. There’s more—including children and puppies and peril—and it’s all too much. But what do I know? Rust and Bone was received warmly, and I heard more than one journalist, besieged by the television reporters desperate for reactions at the end of every Competition press screening, declare, “C’est un film extraordinaire.

The high-pitched hysteria continued with Lou Ye’s Mystery, which opens Un Certain Regard. Based on an online diary, Lou’s film—his first “official” production after running afoul of censors in his native China with 2006’s Summer Palace (the clandestinely shot Spring Fever was shown in Competition in 2009)—centers on a businessman, Yongzhao (Qin Hao), with a secret second family and multiple lovers. Mystery opens with a spectacular hit-and-run and follows with two head bludgeonings (one in slo-mo), slaps (some self-inflicted), shrieking, revenge rutting, crooked cops, and a spectral visitation. Speaking of the supernatural, I credit the publicist who insisted on seeing my badge as I entered the screening with having ESP: She dismissed me haughtily, surely sensing what my reaction to the film would be.

Melissa Anderson