Born in 1932 in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, the New York–based photographer Duane Michals is widely celebrated for his photo sequences—as exemplified in his 1970 book Sequences—as well as for writing messages and poems directly onto his images to collapse time, experience, and emotions. This year promises to be a significant one for Michals. From November 1, 2014 to February 16, 2015, Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Art will host a major retrospective of his work. “Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals” will consider how the artist was primarily inspired in the 1960s by René Magritte, Balthus, and Giorgio de Chirico to broaden traditional notions of photography and put into motion his influential visual stories. Recently, Michals sat down in his home to discuss his early career in New York, his influences, and his partner, the architect Fred Gorree, with whom he has lived for more than fifty years.

Interview with Duane Michals.

— As told to Stephanie Bailey