COLUMNS

  • Books

    POPism: The Warhol '60s and Picasso, Photographs from 1951-1972

    POPism: The Warhol ’60s, by Andy Warhol & Pat Hackett, New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980, 192 pages, 8 illustrations.

    Andy has done it again. After hitting the top with Pop and movies and socialites and superstars, reinventing art pompier for our time, and defining celebrity once and for all, Warhol, with collaborator Pat Hackett, has told a story called POPism: The Warhol ’60s. It is the best book I’ve read about what it was like then to be involved with contemporary art and to be in New York.

    With a cast that includes most of the painters, writers, dealers and collectors that seemed to

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  • Books

    Italian Drawings 1780-1890, August Sander, Twentieth-Century European Painting, Jackson Pollock, African Furniture

    Italian Drawings 1780-1890, by Roberta J.M. Olson, New York: The American Federation of Arts, and Bloomington, Ind., and London: Indiana University Press, 1980, 247 pages, 107 illustrations, including 4 in color.

    In format this is an old-masterish catalogue comprising a lot of good full-page, black-and-white illustrations with an introductory essay. Frankly, I was hoping for the kind of drawing problem that I really like, where the conservative and the radical in the 19th century may not be as distinct as is assumed (and which I took up in The Burlington Magazine (April 1977) with a letter from

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  • Books

    Photo-Realism, Egyptian Art, Native Arts of North America, Chinese Art, The Art of French Glass, American Art Nouveau

    Photo-Realism, by Louis K. Meisel, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1980, 528 pages, 1,203 illustrations, including 710 in color.

    As a key dealer in Photo-Realist painting, Louis Meisel is the ideal guide through this collection of illustrations, bibliographies and exhibition lists. While exception can be taken to Gregory Battcock’s suggestion in the foreword that Photo-Realism “has raised the possibility of art appreciation on the basis of subject matter,” Meisel’s first three criteria for Photo-Realist work seem to the point: “The Photo-Realist uses the camera and photograph to gather information.

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  • Books

    American Prints and Printmakers: A chronicle of over 400 artists and their prints from 1900 to the present

    Una E. Johnson, American Prints and Printmakers: A chronicle of over 400 artists and their prints from 1900 to the present (Garden City: Doubleday and Company, 1980), 366 pages.

    We have a strong literature of technical how-to books on prints for the artist and the student with many contemporary works reproduced and some examination of how they were made, but not how they came to be made. We have monographs and notes or essays in exhibition catalogues. At the Brooklyn Museum, Gene Baro’s 30 Years of American Printmaking (1976) went beyond most catalogue efforts. At the Museum of Modern Art, New

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  • Books

    Joseph Masheck

    Moholy-Nagy: Photographs and Photograms, essay by Andreas Haus, translated by Frederic Samson (Munich: Schirmer-Mosel, GmbH., 1978; New York: Pantheon Books, 1980).

    The very artiness of this great Hungarian modernist’s photographs can put me off, even though it all takes place on a very high level, and even though the photographs seem to be reproduced with an almost reverent fineness, which must not have been easy to achieve. (Moholy himself had an extraordinary devotion to the most delicate and minute physical properties of the photographic object.) The essay by Haus, who teaches art history at

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  • Books

    Parker Hodges

    Edward Ruscha, Guacamole Airlines and other drawings (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1980), 96 pages, 84 illustrations, including 30 in color.

    What Edward Ruscha says about signs and symbols, myths, drugs, houses and vegetables is clear and relaxing. Whether short texts with single words dropped out of colored backgrounds, or images of aspirins, fireplaces, hit records, or apartment houses and the Los Angeles Times, (earlier trademarks) Ruscha takes as his material familiar stuff. How could anyone fail to smile at Those Of Us Who Have Double Parked, 1976, which consists of just that text, in four

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  • Books

    Artforum editors

    Victor Arwas, Art Deco (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.), 316 pages, 416 illustrations, including 200 in color.

    This must be the most lavish book on Art Deco ever published. It may even be the last word on the movement. Except for a few out of focus black-and-white illustrations, the reproductions of bookbindings, glass, statuettes, jewelry, metalwork, paintings, furniture, textiles and ceramics are stunning. The fact that so many of the objects shown are either in the author’s collection or that of his gallery, Editions Graphiques, in London, has clearly given him unlimited access to a large

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  • Passages

    Rosalie Onorato: 1949–1980

    Rosalie Onorato died of leukemia on Sunday, April 27, 1980, at the age of 31. She was Circulation Director of Artforum from 1975 to 1979. We at Artforum are deeply saddened.

    We thought it would be fitting to notify Rosalie’s Artforum friends and colleagues that a book fund has been established in her memory at the Mabel Smith Douglass Library.

    Any contributions can be addressed directly to:

    Mabel Smith Douglass Library

    Rutgers University

    New Brunswick, New Jersey

    08903

    Sincerely yours,

    Nancy Rosen

    Laurie Simmons

    Rhoda Weisburg

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  • Books

    Lisette Model: An Aperture Monograph

    LISETTE MODEL IS SURELY photography’s Greta Garbo, a living legend surrounded by an aura of mystery. Interestingly, Model’s mystery is maintained even in this, the first major book of her photographs. The book is physically stunning—a deluxe 12- by 15-inch format contains 52 large prints—spanning the greater part of her career from the late 1930s to the early 1970s. It is the most complete view we have had of Model’s distinctive way of seeing. The photographs are accompanied by a chronology of Model’s life and career, a bibliography of articles about and shows by Model, and a brief introduction

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  • Books

    A Fable of Modern Art

    FOR INNUMERABLE ARTISTS, FRENHOFER WAS a powerful and abiding reference. Legend has it that at the end of his life the aged Cézanne, on hearing the Balzac fable, pointed his finger to his chest, designating himself as Frenhofer. Picasso illustrated the text, often quoted from its credos, and boasted to his friends of inhabiting Frenhofer’s world. Matisse revered him, Rilke paraphrased him, and Schoenberg emulated his precepts. To this day, de Kooning and scores of others still make allusions to Frenhofer’s quizzical tale. But who, then, is Frenhofer?

    On one level, surely, he is the hero of The

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  • Books

    Romanticism

    SOME CRITICS FIND CLASSICISM in a grain of sand and Romanticism in a wildflower. In doing his journalistic best to report diligently on so-called Romantic phenomena, Hugh Honour creates a highly wrought textbook for students, but one that is not going to convince scholars of anything.1

    In the first half of this century, as Jacques Barzun reminds us in his Classic, Romantic, and Modern (1961), there was a lashing out against Romanticism, seen as neo-primitivistic and nationalistic. Then there was an attempt, by Barzun and others, to understand and rehabilitate and vivify our sense of the Romantics

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  • Books

    The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright

    David A. Hanks, The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright (New York: E.P. Dutton, 1979), 272 pages.

    FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S FINEST achievements—the Winslow House, 1893, the Avery Coonley House, 1908, the Robie House, 1908, Falling Water, 1936, and that museum to end museums, the Guggenheim, 1943–57—place him in the front rank of world architecture. Yet his decorative designs, of which there are hundreds, and upon which he set great store, are often, with some notable exceptions, disappointing. Perhaps this is not so surprising, since there is a limit to the amount of quality work any individual

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