COLUMNS

  • Books

    Eduard Trier's Form and Space

    Eduard Trier, Form and Space, (New York: Praeger) 1962. 291 pages, 213 illustrations.

    SCULPTORS REST HELPLESSLY at the mercy of photographers, for, creating objects meant to be seen from a great many viewpoints, they work at complete cross-purposes from the camera, with its single, static view. And, should the camera choose an unflattering view, the other views are not available to redeem the piece. Another danger derives from the drama of shadows and highlights which the photographer can manipulate at will, so that often enough the true work, seen after a photograph of the same object, is

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  • Books

    Fred W. McDarrah's “The Artist’s World in Pictures”

    Fred W. McDarrah, The Artist’s World in Pictures (New York: Dutton), 1961, 192 pp.

    SO MUCH HAS THE MILIEU in which contemporary art is created become a part of our understanding of that art, that it is no surprise at all to discover that in a book comprising over three hundred photographs whose exclusive subject matter is “The Artist’s World,” less than a dozen of these photographs actually reproduce works of art. The rest of the book is given over entirely to an attempt to convey something of the mood and flavor of the hectic, feverish world of cold-water lofts, gallery openings, critics,

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  • Books

    Jack Burnham’s Beyond Modern Sculpture

    Jack Burnham, “Beyond Modern Sculpture: The Effects of Science and Technology on the Sculpture of This Century” (George Braziller, 1968); 402 pages, 135 illustrations in black and white.

    BEYOND MODERN SCULPTURE IS a strange book. It seems to be about a very modern type of sculpture which employs materials related to science and technology. As such it is aggressively up-to-date and indeed looks to the future, as the title implies (assuming “beyond” means “ahead in time,” not “over in the next county,” or some such). But if Beyond Modern Sculpture was really about technologically implemented light

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  • Top Ten

    Tod Lippy

    Tod Lippy is an artist, designer, editor, writer, and curator based in Brooklyn. He is the creator of the nonprofit arts publication Esopus (2003–2018) and executive director of the Esopus Foundation.

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  • Top Ten

    DonChristian

    DonChristian is a New York-based artist, musician, and teacher. He creates videos, public murals, and time- and music-based performances. He has shown work at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art, MoMA PS1, and the New Museum. He is also touring his debut album, Where There’s Smoke (2018), throughout Europe and North America.

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  • Top Ten

    Jeremy O. Harris

    Jeremy O. Harris is an actor and playwright currently residing in New Haven, Connecticut, by way of Los Angeles, California. Upcoming productions include Slave Play at the New York Theatre Workshop this fall, and “Daddy”—coproduced by New York’s Vineyard Theatre and the New Group—starring Alan Cumming, in winter 2019. He received the Rosa Parks Playwriting Award and the Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award for Slave Play, and is currently under commission from Lincoln Center Theater and Playwrights Horizons, both in New York.

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    Marilyn Minter

    Marilyn Minter is an artist and activist who lives and works in New York. She has staged solo exhibitions at numerous institutions in the United States and abroad, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; La Conservera, Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Murcia, Spain; the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland; and the Deichtorhallen, Hamburg. She is currently preparing for solo shows at Baldwin Gallery in Aspen and at Lehmann Maupin in Hong Kong.

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