Anneka Lenssen

  • “Hassan Khan: Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said”

    A crucial tension in Hassan Khan’s heteroclite practice arises from his dual exploration of popular meaning and semiotic inscrutability. Khan’s engagement with everyday social interactions manifests in an aesthetics of recondite things. Recently, shows of his work in Cairo and São Paulo featured mediations of this tension via narrative twists on portraiture: Texts told of men named Mahmoud El Ansari and Marcelo de Andrade, each lost in an ornate melodrama of self-presentation. At the Museum für Moderne Kunst, Khan’s solo exhibition will feature a small

  • Magdi Mostafa

    Magdi Mostafa makes art via a process of sensory bricolage, typically constructing his installations by capturing light and sound inputs from everyday routines and layering them into new spaces. His 2010 work Transparent Existence filled the basement of Cairo’s Mawlawi Museum with a track of LED lights that followed the shape of the ecstatic dance movements Sufis had once performed there. With the lights programmed to respond to an ambient sixteen-channel sound work incorporating recordings from the site and surrounding streets, the piece overwrote its physical parameters with vibratory presences

  • Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art

    WHEN SYRIAN ARTIST Fateh al-Moudarres painted his version of The Last Supper in 1965, he summoned forth apostles, idols, and goblets of table wine in an entirely unholy configuration. Now on public view for the first time in decades at the newly opened Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha, Qatar, the canvas is a nearly six-foot-tall concretion of oil paint, sand, and wax that makes an unapologetic argument for Christ’s adjacency to conspiracy and consumption. The original buyer for the piece? The cultural attaché at the American embassy in Damascus, who, despite the unwieldiness of both

  • On The Opening Exhibitions At Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art

    WHEN SYRIAN ARTIST Fateh al-Moudarres painted his version of The Last Supper in 1965, he summoned forth apostles, idols, and goblets of table wine in an entirely unholy configuration. Now on public view for the first time in decades at the newly opened Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha, Qatar, the canvas is a nearly six-foot-tall concretion of oil paint, sand, and wax that makes an unapologetic argument for Christ’s adjacency to conspiracy and consumption.

    WHEN SYRIAN ARTIST Fateh al-Moudarres painted his version of The Last Supper in 1965, he summoned forth apostles, idols, and goblets of table wine in an entirely unholy configuration. Now on public view for the first time in decades at the newly opened Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha, Qatar, the canvas is a nearly six-foot-tall concretion of oil paint, sand, and wax that makes an unapologetic argument for Christ’s adjacency to conspiracy and consumption. The original buyer for the piece? The cultural