Annette Ferrara

  • Glamour: Fashion, Industrial Design, Architecture

    Glamour’s got a bad rap in modern design circles, but this sure-to-be-fabulous show may change all that. The combination of such glamourous offerings as a 1965 Jaguar E-type and couture clothes by Yves Saint Laurent for Dior with more recent interpretations like Herzog & de Meuron’s Tokyo Prada boutique and a diamond-encrusted Rolex should please hardened design divas and shopaholic fashionistas alike.

    Glamour’s got a bad rap in modern design circles, but this sure-to-be-fabulous show may change all that. Connoting affectation and deception—it’s the “ugly stepsister of elegance,” quips curator Joseph Rosa—glamour had no place in the strict, right-angled minimalism of the early twentieth century. But its delusive charm crept back into fashion, industrial design, and architecture after 1945 to become a hallmark of consumer culture. The combination of such glamourous offerings as a 1965 Jaguar E-type and couture clothes by Yves Saint Laurent for Dior with more recent interpretations like Herzog

  • Dan Peterman

    “Environmental” is the lazy way of describing Dan Peterman’s work.

    “Environmental” is the lazy way of describing Dan Peterman’s work. While his art is about resource recovery— he incorporates recycled materials into his projects—it’s also alchemical, sociological, and activist. Formally indebted to Smithson and Judd, Peterman’s pioneering work still holds underground standing in his home city of Chicago, but his first major survey in the US should change that. Seventeen works made since 1985 constitute the show’s bulk, while an archive features site-specific and nonextant projects. Peterman has also created four new installations, including

  • Ant Farm

    Deprived of a centuries-old architectural history to rebel against, the Ant Farmers integrated architecture with art, design, and video, all with a singular wittiness.

    Europe in the 1960s and ’70s was a heady hodgepodge of radical utopian architectural groups such as Archigram, Utopie, and Superstudio. But the US had renegade architects Chip Lord, Doug Michels, and Curtis Schreier—aka Ant Farm. Deprived of a centuries-old architectural history to rebel against, the Ant Farmers integrated architecture with art, design, and video, all with a singular wittiness. This, their first museum retrospective, features over two hundred components dating from 1968 to 1978, including blueprints, architectural models, collages,