Annie Ochmanek

  • Ger van Elk

    One of the first pieces visitors encounter when approaching the Kröller-Müller Museum is by Ger van Elk (1941–2014), though it can easily be trampled underfoot without notice. Replacement Piece, 1969/2011, is a permanently installed square meter of pavement that has been removed and cleanly substituted with a digital print of itself to scale. This slight tweak in the fabric of normality, this unnecessary embellishment, is classic Van Elk. The piece was first realized outside the Kunsthalle Bern, in Switzerland, for Harald Szeemann’s 1969 post-Minimal buffet “Live in Your Head: When Attitudes

  • “Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965”

    In the Beatnik decade, before Pop art went big and the contemporary market we know today began to take shape, artist-operated exhibition spaces in New York served as integral counterparts to the city’s uptown galleries. Artists could show and be seen at Tenth Street cooperatives (funded by members’ dues), including the Tanager, Hansa, and Brata galleries, and at off–Tenth Street spots such as the Judson Gallery and the studio lofts of Red Grooms and Yoko Ono. These spaces bore the collective and improvisatory spirit of the Happenings they hosted, but were also effective

  • Whitney Biennial

    In its final year uptown, the Whitney presents three Biennials in one, giving a floor to each of a trio of outside organizers. Michelle Grabner, artist and impresario of the Suburban in Oak Park, Illinois, will usher in painting and sculpture with special attention to craft; ICA Philadelphia curator and WhiteWalls publisher Anthony Elms will cast an editor’s eye on cultural production; and MoMA’s Stuart Comer will top it all off with expertise in film and performance. Though this parfait-style exhibition may prove difficult to pin down,

  • Tony Conrad

    Tony Conrad has made his way through the past half century of cultural shifts by puncturing paradigms to let out some of the hot air. While his major contributions to movements from minimal music to structural film to media studies are only growing in recognition, it was no surprise that this exhibition, organized by Michael Cohen along with the artist, forestalled nostalgic retrospection. Viewers were greeted with a window display ostensibly referencing New York University’s controversial expansion plan, with blinking caution barriers and a wheelbarrow of cement mix—signals of a work in

  • “Jim Shaw: The Rinse Cycle”

    Known to plumb thrift store bins and his own dreams alike, Jim Shaw works with the aesthetic backdrops to the minds of his generation: sci-fi special effects, dorm-room psychedelia, comics, zombie movies, and cultish memorabilia.

    Known to plumb thrift store bins and his own dreams alike, Jim Shaw works with the aesthetic backdrops to the minds of his generation: sci-fi special effects, dorm-room psychedelia, comics, zombie movies, and cultish memorabilia. During the past decade, Shaw has been repurposing disused stage scenery for murals that mix iconographies of O-ism (his homegrown, phony religion) with those of political conspiracy. Masonic symbols and household appliances float, as if abducted, atop these found, generic landscapes. “The Rinse Cycle” will bring together about one hundred of

  • picks January 31, 2012

    Gerald Ferguson

    The late Gerald Ferguson, a revered fixture of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, was included in the foundational 1970 “Information” exhibition at MoMA, and his work—remarkably—didn’t appear in New York again until now. This survey, curated by Luke Murphy, includes eleven stenciled and frottaged paintings that bear all the marks of Ferguson’s consistently matter-of-fact approach.

    In the 1960s, Ferguson made drawings with typewritten text, spray-painted stenciled grids of letters and punctuation marks onto canvas (three of which are on view here), and eventually assembled The Standard

  • Christopher D’Arcangelo

    In an attempt to find alternatives to “curatorial control” I am making the following proposal to you the reader:

    A. You will find that the following page of this journal has been left blank. That page is yours.

    B. You can remove that page from this journal and do anything you want on it.

    C. You can then install the page anyplace in the viewing space of LAICA, at any time and in anyway you want.

    I am aware of the fact that this proposal is a product of “curatorial control.” In any case it is my hope that, through these kinds of activities from inside and outside the art world, we may find alternatives

  • James Siena

    For his third solo show at the Pace Gallery, James Siena assembled graphic paintings, prints, and drawings made in the past three years. Executing premeditated compositional directives freehand and using the slick combination of sign painter’s enamel on aluminum, Siena creates jiving geometric patterns whose careful craftsmanship marks them with durational depth and attractive immediacy. While the underlying structures of his compositions afford them a measured integrity, the unruliness of the lines’ behavior makes them come alive.

    A step-by-step sequence of engravings, Non-Slice: Ten Progressive

  • Jacques Hurtubise

    A master of the controlled accident, Jacques Hurtubise is recognized for his splash—that icon of painterly incident whose fluid shape he carefully outlines, stencils, or symmetrically blots onto his canvases in electric color palettes.

    A master of the controlled accident, Jacques Hurtubise is recognized for his splash—that icon of painterly incident whose fluid shape he carefully outlines, stencils, or symmetrically blots onto his canvases in electric color palettes. In the late 1960s, Hurtubise began working with square canvases and joining them in grids, shifting them like tectonic plates under an erupting gesture, or dismantling them and rearranging his compositions into formal puzzles. His “Blackout Paintings” of the 1970s leave any activity almost entirely eclipsed, with affichiste-like shreds