Brian Eno

  • Brian Eno and Peter Saville

    THE LAST TIME I LOOKED, there were about a hundred million trillion stars in the universe. It seems to get a couple of zeros bigger every time I check.

    That means there should be hundreds of trillions of habitable planets, and yet we’ve never seen a single sign of intelligent life other than on ours.

    Observing this, Enrico Fermi said, “Where is it all?” 

    What if there have been millions of other life-forms and civilizations, but we just missed them in the vastness of space and time? What if we missed them because they don’t actually last very long . . . because there is some self-limiting factor

  • Writing Space

    Writing Space: The Computer, Hypertext, and the History of Writing, by Jay David Bolter. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1991, 258 pp.

    IN THE ACT OF WRITING, the writer externalizes his or her thoughts. The writer enters into a reflective and reflexive relationship with the written page, a relationship in which thoughts are bodied forth. It becomes difficult to say where thinking ends and writing begins, where the mind ends and the writing space begins. With any technique of writing—on stone or clay, papyrus or paper, and particularly on the computer screen—the writer comes to regard the mind

  • Aurora Musicalis

    BRIAN ENO IS BEST KNOWN for his music—he has l3 solo albums and 7 singles to his credit, besides numerous collaborations (with Roxy Music, David Bowie, John Cale, and Daniel LanOis, among others) and over 20 productions of albums for other musicians (including the Talking Heads and U2). He has also written music for films and commercials. Yet Eno, who attended art schools for five years, beginning at age 16, is also a video artist, whose work has encompassed not only videotapes but also 45 audiovisual installations in galleries and public places in Europe, America, and Japan. Until recently, my