Brigitte Huck

  • Mel Ramos, The Four Seasons, Autumn, 1982, oil on canvas,  42 1/8 x 92 3/8". From the series “The Four Seasons,” 1982–84.

    Mel Ramos

    Everybody knows Mel Ramos as the tits and ass man. But the disdain behind the association was recently repudiated by a retrospective, his largest to date, in honor of his seventy-fifth birthday. Of course his exhibition, titled “Girls, Candies and Comics,” featured buxom women on ketchup bottles and in martini glasses. It is the series “The Lost Paintings of 1965,” 1993–, “Hav-a-Havana,” 1996–, and “Animal Paintings,” 1964–71—all of which one might certainly consider somewhat perverse, with their locker-door goddesses lasciviously draping themselves on spark plugs, Havana cigars, or

  • View of “Josef Dabernig,” 2011.

    Josef Dabernig

    Distributing a medium across the thousand plateaus of perception is an exercise that visual artist and filmmaker Josef Dabernig has mastered like no one else. He studied sculpture, but since then has been dissolving the concept of sculpture in the acid bath of media plurality—a plurality that this creator of conceptual cross-references identifies as “film, photo, text, object, architecture.” For his recent show “Sports Grounds and Structural Approach,” Dabernig put his eclectically expressive vocabulary at the disposal of a personal passion: soccer (previously the subject of one of his most

  • Katrina Daschner, Flamingo Massacre, 2011, color photograph, 24 3/8 x 44".

    Katrina Daschner

    For Katrina Daschner, it’s always showtime. The artist, born in 1973 in Hamburg, recently received the Otto Mauer Prize, the most important award for contemporary art that Austria has to offer, given by the Archdiocese of Vienna in memory of a priest and cathedral pastor. The work of this artist is anything but pious, however. She based her 2005 project Dolores on Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita and went on to found the band SV DAMENKRAFT (Lady Power Sports Club) before campaigning for radical performative practice in the Salon Lady Chutney she founded in Vienna, and belly dancing in such art institutions

  • Geta Bratescu, Medeic Callisthetic Moves II, 1980, yarn on fabric, 23 5/8 x 19 5/8".

    Geta Bratescu

    Nine square black-and-white photographs mounted in rows of three opened this remarkable survey of the work of Romanian Conceptual artist Geta Bratescu. The emblematic Towards White, 1976—a set of photographs of the artist covering everything in her studio in white paper and fabric—situates the work of this legendary figure of the Bucharest art scene in terms of process and act, identity and space. In this work, Bratescu documents processes that take us from black to white, from motion to stasis. The images show transformations, both of the protagonist in the space—in the final

  • Imi Knoebel

    What financial crisis? Thaddaeus Ropac has shown his bullish attitude by expanding his gallery empire with a “multiuse hall” in Salzburg, measuring some twenty-eight thousand square feet. This functional building doesn’t look like much on the outside, but its interior is all Chelsea flair and seems to exemplify the spirit of cool. Some two thousand square feet of exhibition space now await the planned four yearly shows, and as much space again serves as a viewing room for large-format works, such as Anselm Kiefer’s twenty-five-foot-long work The Fertile Crescent, 2009.

    The opening show in the

  • Hubert Scheibl

    Hubert Scheibl is exhibiting nice fat ducks and a crocodile just outside Vienna. It’s a bit of a surprise to see such a menagerie being put on display by a long-standing practitioner of the gradually eroding artistic discipline known as abstract painting, but in his quest to surreptitiously absent himself from the realm of the oil-on-canvas—his activity in this field currently being shown at the Essl, Austria’s largest private museum, under the telling title “Fat Ducks”—Scheibl is resisting the sorts of surefire methods made popular by Gerhard Richter. Instead, he is working to expand his turf

  • “The Death of the Audience”

    The Vienna Secession filled the difficult art-world summer gap with revolutionary panache and imaginative profundity. Curator Pierre Bal-Blanc, head of the Centre d’Art Contemporain in the Paris suburb of Brétigny, called with impeccable logic for the death not of the author but of the audience. Why should the public any more than the artist be compartmentalized or privileged?

    The thirty-five artists included are all over fifty years old, having lived through and possibly been influenced by the rebellions of the 1960s; marginalized both by institutions and by the art market, they have cultivated

  • Sophie Calle, Peace Dove (Nikolaiviertel), 1996, framed color photograph, 52 x 40 1/8". From Die Entfernung—The Detachment, 1996.

    1989

    Twenty years since the end of the cold war and finally, a proper jubilee! “1989: The End of History or Beginning of the Future? Comments on a Paradigm Shift” assembles the work of thirty-three artists who speak to the rupture the titular year represents.

    Twenty years since the end of the cold war and finally, a proper jubilee! “1989: The End of History or Beginning of the Future? Comments on a Paradigm Shift” assembles the work of thirty-three artists who speak to the rupture the titular year represents. Eschewing pedantic sociohistorical analyses of the Berlin Wall and the iron curtain, the exhibition will be organized around ten central concepts, ranging from “Anatomy of Melancholy” to “Illusions of Capital.” Expect to experience space-hungry installations such as Ilya and Emilia Kabokov’s Great Archive

  • Klaus Weber

    In taking over the cool white cube of the Vienna Secession, Klaus Weber introduced a Baroque emotionality. Effortlessly unbalancing the Jugendstil symmetry of the central court, he used light, sound, and even odor to shake up this monument to functionality. In an anarchic masque, Beauty, Pleasure, Time, and Disillusionment appeared as allegorical figures on a stage that Weber prepared for his unusual repertoire. This versatile impresario, conceptual artist, resourceful laboratory technician, and master of the cover version knows, as the Situationists once said, that there’s a beach beneath the

  • Roman Ondák

    A video shows a group of people on the banks of a river. They are occupied with the game of skipping stones. But the “river” is actually the Panama Canal. In order to carry out this deceptively simple project, Across That Place, 2008, in the Panama Canal Zone, the Slovakian artist Roman Ondák had to confront all manner of bureaucratic hurdles—expending much logistical effort in the service of perceptual experience, in the attempt to make things visible that are not visual, including temporality and political boundaries. In the context of the exhibition, this experience was manifested as the

  • Atelier van Lieshout

    Joep van Lieshout, Dutch multitasker and founder of Atelier van Lieshout (AVL), the now-legendary anarchic free state in Rotterdam harbor, gets on well with Vienna. In 2001, for instance, he brought a mobile field kitchen into the city’s elegant center and handed out home-cooked gourmet goulash à la Bocuse to all comers, be they vernissage attendees or casual passersby. In June 2008, with the city gripped by European Football Championship fever, the utopian and artistic provocateur made it clear that he has as much if not more going on as a producer of self-contained sculpture than as an instigator

  • Francis Bacon, Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, ca. 1944, triptych, oil on board, each 37 x 29".

    Francis Bacon

    This fall, in honor of Francis Bacon’s hundredth birthday, Tate Britain will mount the first retrospective of the artist’s work in the UK since 1985, on a scale befitting the occasion.

    This fall, in honor of Francis Bacon’s hundredth birthday, Tate Britain will mount the first retrospective of the artist’s work in the UK since 1985, on a scale befitting the occasion. Curators Matthew Gale and Chris Stephens anticipate no less than a complete reassessment of Bacon’s oeuvre, drawing in part on new findings that have emerged since scholars gained access to Bacon’s studio shortly after his death in 1992. Featuring seventy paintings spanning his sixty-year career—including icons Study After Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X, 1953,