Cameron Martin

  • “Amy Sillman: One Lump or Two”

    Though Amy Sillman publicly declared that she had “broken up” with abstraction a few years ago, her recent work would suggest that the two are back on speaking terms. Their on-again, off-again relationship will be examined in Sillman’s first museum survey—which brings together more than ninety works made from 1988 to the present—and in the accompanying catalogue, with essays by Thomas Eggerer, Ewa Lajer-Burcharth, Daniel Marcus, and ICA curator Helen Molesworth. Best known for her dense and lavishly colored paintings that explore the ongoing potential of the

  • Cheyney Thompson

    Taking up the reins of 1960s and ’70s French Conceptual painting, Cheyney Thompson registers and examines the problematics inherent in painting’s production, economy, and circulation.

    Taking up the reins of 1960s and ’70s French Conceptual painting, Cheyney Thompson registers and examines the problematics inherent in painting’s production, economy, and circulation. His methodology tends toward generative systems, as in his “Chronochromes” series, 2009– (to be prominently featured at MIT), in which the calendar is tied to the turn-of-the-century numerical color model of Albert H. Munsell, such that each linen-weave-shaped mark painted on the work’s surface corresponds to the month, day, and hour of its production. Incorporating more than thirty paintings

  • Dike Blair

    ONE OF THE MANY gratifying aspects of Dike Blair’s ten-year sculpture and painting survey, “Now and Again,” recently on view at the Weatherspoon Art Musuem in Greensboro, North Carolina, was how it allowed the artist to fully exercise his understated but considerable talent for exhibition design. Though he operated well in advance of the design-as-art environment of the mid-1990s, transforming galleries into corporate lounges that worked as ambient takes on mass architecture, Blair left behind installation art per se many years ago. This exhibition’s subtle staging, however, managed to come just