Caroline A. Jones

  • LIGHT SPEED: DAN FLAVIN AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY

    ICONIC SUBLIMATION

    A retrospective at the National Gallery of Art is the closest thing the American art world has to an imperial investiture, and Dan Flavin’s Washington, DC, survey was no exception. Emphatically attesting to Minimalism’s current aura, the East Wing’s squashed hexagons, triangles, and podlike vestibules were filled with his emanating objects, interiors taking on the lure of grottoes and sanctuaries (especially appealing when clusters of related works hummed and glowed together), while a modular green piece flashed from the lobby like Martian bling-bling onto Pennsylvania Avenue

  • Mirror-Travels: Robert Smithson and History

    CANONIZED FOUNDER OF EARTHWORKS, filmmaker, respected antiformalist theorist, “preconscious” religious visionary, homoerotic draftsman, and Beat poet (not to mention posthumous market-driven photographer)—these Robert Smithsons have proliferated since the artist aligned himself with the new entropic monuments later designated as Minimal art. Perhaps because of his deadpan enthusiasm for what he called the “inactive history” of Flavin, Judd, et al., the eccentric works Smithson produced from roughly 1964 to 1969 (Minimalism’s heyday) are useful tools for scholars trying to get inside the Minimalist