Caroline Lillian Schopp


    IN THE SUMMER of 1972, at Documenta 5, Franz Erhard Walther demonstrated the use of the fifty-eight discrete objects of his 1. Werksatz (First Work Set), 1963–69. Now iconic, the 1. Werksatz exemplifies the type of art for which Walther is best known: wall-hung or floor-bound cloth works that are meant to be activated in particular ways by visitors, or “users.” Documenta 5 presents a historic moment in the changing attitudes of institutions and the public toward participatory or action-based art. Curated by Harald Szeemann under the rubric “Questioning Reality,” the exhibition marked the

  • “Beuys Brock Vostell”

    This ambitious, extensively researched exhibition, “Beuys Brock Vostell,” curated by Peter Weibel with Eckhart Gillen, takes as its starting point several collective actions in which Joseph Beuys, Bazon Brock, and Wolf Vostell participated. These include the international Fluxus Festival der Neuen Kunst (Festival of New Art) in Aachen, Germany, in July 1964, a pioneering live television broadcast from Düsseldorf in December of the same year, and finally the Happening 24 Stunden (24 Hours) at Galerie Parnass in Wuppertal, Germany, in June 1965, which also included Charlotte Moorman, Nam June

  • Sofie Thorsen

    “Just as axonometric projection eliminates every fixed, unique viewpoint,” writes Yve-Alain Bois in his essay “Metamorphoses of Axonometry” (1981/1983), “so it has been used throughout history in a multiple, contradictory fashion.” Sofie Thorsen’s recent work evokes parallel complexity, exploring axonometry through wall drawings and panels in a series of “Screens Within Screens,” 2014. While this title refers to one specific component of her work on view—meshes of black-line wall drawings executed on three of Krobath’s five walls—it also describes the multiplication and interplay of

  • Thomas Hartmann

    For more than three decades, Thomas Hartmann has explored the materiality of oil paint and repeatedly shown how it can attenuate tensions between interior and exterior, massive and minute, visible and legible. Like many postwar German painters—from Anselm Kiefer to David Schnell—Hartmann pursues this investigation at the border of figuration and abstraction. Crystallizing his unique achievement, the seven large oils exhibited recently in Vienna concern the ubiquity and increasing homogeneity of storage in contemporary life. The canvases suggest shelves, hard drives, folders, books,