Celso Fioravante

  • São Paulo Bienal

    Having survived the political rumblings that shook its foundations in 2000, the twenty-fifth edition of the São Paulo Bienal takes as its theme “Metropolitan Iconographies,” as reflected in the work of some 150 artists.

    Having survived the political rumblings that shook its foundations in 2000, the twenty-fifth edition of the São Paulo Bienal takes as its theme “Metropolitan Iconographies,” as reflected in the work of some 150 artists. In this multisection exhibition organized by German curator Alfons Hug, the focus is on eleven key cities (from New York to Beijing) as well as a fantasy twelfth metropolis comprising artists who live and work in multiple locations, such as Vanessa Beecroft and Carsten Höller. This year, sixty-five countries have sent national representatives (Kara Walker

  • Guggenheim for Brazil

    BRAZILIAN ART CIRCLES are variously welcoming and wary over news that Rio de Janeiro may become home to the first Guggenheim Museum branch in the Southern Hemisphere. In November, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation announced that it would undertake a “feasibility study” to investigate cultural projects in Brazil, but grand plans are already well along. Thomas Krens, director of the foundation, has visited the country three times in thirteen months. Frank O. Gehry, the architect behind the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, on his first-ever visit to Rio last fall, praised the “Cidade Maravilhosa” (

  • São Paulo's new curator

    On November 21 the Bienal Foundation of São Paulo confirmed the appointment of German Alfons Hug as curator of the 25th Bienal, scheduled for April 2002—the first time a non-Brazilian has helmed the event. But given the crisis that has rocked the institution since May of last year—two postponements and infighting that resulted in the resignation of six council members and curator Ivo Mesquita (see November issue)—now is as good a time as any for an outsider to step in.

    Indeed, many in the Brazilian art world support the appointment of a foreign curator: “Choosing a stranger is a

  • the São Paulo Bienal

    SINCE EARLY MAY, the São Paulo Bienal has been embroiled in perhaps the greatest crisis since its inception in 1951. Originally scheduled to open last April, the 25th Bienal was postponed twice, the curator walked out, and six council members resigned, leaving the event in limbo. Whereas previous disagreements have been resolved behind closed doors, in this case council and board members aired their views in the media, which broke the scandal wide open and badly damaged the international credibility of the Bienal Foundation. “It was a dark period in our history. People refused to return our