Christine Mehring

  • Anselm Kiefer

    Will Anselm Kiefer ever overcome his limited American reputation as Germany’s premier history painter, working the nation through its National Socialist past? This sixty-work survey will provide US viewers with a metaphysical take on the artist’s practice. The exhibition traces the dialogue between heaven and earth in Kiefer’s oeuvre, from one of his earliest artist’s books, The Heavens, 1969, to recent engagements with Jewish mysticism.

    Travels to the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, Feb. 12–May 7, 2006; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, June

  • Josef Albers

    One by one, the famous “Homage to the Square” paintings are easily dismissed as Albers-the-artist's brainy illustrations of Albers-the-teacher's color theories. En masse, they confound more than explain. Curators Weiermair and Vecchi assemble thirty-five “Homages” along with some forty other paintings and photo collages for Albers's first monographic show in Italy.

    Jasper Johns once took a color test designed by Josef Albers and reported back: “Mr. Albers, I took your color test and got all the answers wrong.” Albers beamed, “Dot's vunderful. You got 100 percent.” One by one, the famous “Homage to the Square” paintings are easily dismissed as Albers-the-artist's brainy illustrations of Albers-the-teacher's color theories. En masse, they confound more than explain. Curators Weiermair and Vecchi assemble thirty-five “Homages” along with some forty other paintings and photo collages for Albers's first monographic

  • Rebecca Horn

    The show places about eighty-five drawings alongside both her early fabric appendages, which extend their wearers’ body parts, and four recent machine installations that perform repetitive bodily tasks.

    This Rebecca Horn exhibition promises to prove that it is not mere platitude to speak of pencil and paper as an extension of the artist’s body. The show places about eighty-five drawings alongside both her early fabric appendages, which extend their wearers’ body parts, and four recent machine installations that perform repetitive bodily tasks. Though bios of Horn routinely mention the year she spent in a sanatorium recovering from lung damage after working with polyester and fiberglass, the artist’s own body has remained a refreshingly puzzling absence in her work.

  • CONTINENTAL SCHRIFT: THE STORY OF INTERFUNKTIONEN

    “Who’s this fascist who thinks he’s an antifascist?”

    With these words, as Benjamin H.D. Buchloh recalls, Marcel Broodthaers voiced his outrage at Anselm Kiefer’s “Occupations” series, featured in the 1975 issue of the German art magazine Interfunktionen. Kiefer’s 1969 project showed the young artist performing the Nazi salute in front of European monuments such as the Colosseum and prompted Broodthaers to withdraw one of his artist’s books from publication under Interfunktionen’s mantle. His reaction effectively cut off funding for the next issue and sealed the fate of what until then had arguably

  • FOUR OF A KIND: THE ART OF BLINKY PALERMO

    IT'S TOO BAD THE BLINKY PALERMO exhibition scheduled to open next month at Barcelona's Museu d'Art Contemporani won't be traveling to the United States. Four Palermo retrospectives have toured European cities since 1980, and none of them has made it to the artist's beloved America. Not that he hasn't been welcome. A Palermo work has just gone up at the Museum of Modern Art's temporary home in Queens, New York, and the Dia Center for the Arts is scheduled to display To the People of New York City, 1976, in the Dia's new Beacon space a short distance up the Hudson next year. To the People was the