Claudia La Rocco

  • William Forsythe

    This show, aptly subtitled “Transfigurations,” includes four video installations made between the mid-1990s and the present, along with Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced, Forsythe’s new interactive Web project developed at Ohio State University.

    Choreography and dance have never been synonymous for William Forsythe: Film, language, and architecture are at least as important to the structure of works like Kammer/Kammer, 2000, as bodies are. Such a genre-defying approach is now standard fare—yet another trend Forsythe set. His influence on ballet (where his roots lie) and beyond cannot easily be overstated. This show, aptly subtitled “Transfigurations,” includes four video installations made between the mid-1990s and the present, along with Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced, Forsythe’s new interactive

  • diary November 23, 2008

    Future Imperfect

    New York

    NEW YORK is the city of the future.

    You heard it here first. Unless, that is, you happened to be one of the fabulously dolled-up folks who braved the heavy rain (and a little economic free fall) last Saturday to attend the Metal Ball, the Performa fund-raising gala held at Cedar Lake in Chelsea. The “city of the future” declaration was made by RoseLee Goldberg, the art historian and Performa’s founding director. The live art biennial will have its third iteration next November, and the theme is “Futurism.” This fact half accounts for Goldberg’s claim; the other half is a sort of defiance in the

  • diary October 23, 2008

    Possibly Maybe

    New York

    This fall, New York’s already impossibly busy performance schedule has been complicated by another, grander form of spectacle: the presidential election. So last Wednesday, at the premiere of Trajal Harrell’s Quartet for the End of Time, it didn’t seem like an off prediction when artist-moderator Ralph Lemon quipped, “Tonight’s the debate, so naturally we’ll be talking to two people.”

    But Harrell isn’t an easy artist to walk away from. As Lemon spoke, the Dance Theater Workshop lobby was already filling up with the usual blend of contemporary performance insiders: influential choreographers like