Courtney Yoshimura

  • interviews September 20, 2018

    John Edmonds

    John Edmonds is a Brooklyn-based artist and photographer whose first monograph, Higher (Capricious, 2018), presents four series made between 2011 and 2018. Edmonds will sign copies of the publication at the New York Art Book Fair at MoMA PS1 at 4 PM on September 21 and will be in conversation with Jessica Bell Brown at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, on September 23. Here, he discusses the origins of each series in the book and his aesthetic choices.

    THE “IMMACULATE” SERIES marks my first intentional set of photographs. When I was making it, I was employing a language around color

  • interviews November 01, 2016

    Emory Douglas

    Emory Douglas is a San Francisco–based activist and artist best known for his work as the minister of culture for the Black Panther Party. Through his work with the Panthers’ newspaper, Douglas was able to communicate powerful messages via simple means, creating some of the most iconic images of Black Power. His work will be a part of “All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50,” which is on view at the Oakland Museum of California through February 12, 2017. In conjunction with Artforum’s “Artists on Politics” feature in the November issue, here Douglas discusses the possibility for change

  • interviews January 14, 2015

    Chitra Ganesh

    Chitra Ganesh is a New York–based contemporary artist whose work centers on feminist narratives via popular graphic and South Asian cultural iconography. Her installation Eyes of Time, 2014, is on view in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art’s Herstory Gallery at the Brooklyn Museum through July 12, 2015.

    EYES OF TIME is a drawing-based installation that also incorporates sculpture into a mural. The main figure takes its inspiration from a key Indian concept of divine feminine power, Shakti, of which the goddess Kali is a fierce iteration. Kali embodies time and change in Hindu and

  • interviews October 08, 2014

    Melanie Bonajo

    Melanie Bonajo is a New York–based artist whose work explores issues of alienation and individual identity in relationship to technological progress and commodity pleasures. Her most recent work is the video NIGHT SOIL: Fake Paradise (Pt 1), 2014, which is on view in “When Elephants Come Marching In” at the De Appel Arts Centre in Amsterdam until January 11, 2015.

    THIS VIDEO is about ayahuasca, a plant-based psychedelic brew that originates in the Amazon, where it has been used for thousands of years. Recently it’s been expanding into the Western world, but it is still kind of niche, not mainstream.

  • interviews March 05, 2014

    A. L. Steiner

    A. L. Steiner is an artist whose visual and curatorial work addresses the pluralities inherent within subjectivity, feminism, and queer herstory. Her most recent installation, More Real than Reality Itself/Cost-benefit analysis will be on view in the 2014 Whitney Biennial from March 7 to May 25, 2014. The work investigates sociocultural, biopolitical, and familial constructions through the lived practices of activists and artists Rita ‘Bo’ Brown, Carla Cloer, Ericka Huggins, Miya Masaoka, and Laurie Weeks. Here, Steiner discusses the piece and her ongoing radical practice.

    DOCUMENTARIES ARE

  • interviews January 21, 2014

    Andrea Bowers

    Andrea Bowers is a Los Angeles–based artist whose work addresses issues of feminism, politics, and community. “#sweetjane,” her exhibition at the Pomona College Museum of Art and Pitzer College Art Galleries in Claremont, California, examines the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio, high school rape case and its trial, drawing attention to issues of “rape culture” and the Internet-based activist group Anonymous, as well as to questions of ethics across social media platforms. The exhibition runs from January 21 to April 13, 2014, at Pomona, and from January 21 to March 28, 2014, at Pitzer.

    I’M FROM A SMALL

  • interviews February 27, 2013

    Martin Rev

    Martin Rev is a New York–based musician and the instrumentalist in Suicide, one of the most celebrated electronic protopunk bands. His debut solo album, Martin Rev, which he recorded in 1980, has been recently rereleased for the first time on vinyl through Superior Viaduct. Here he speaks about what it feels like to have it reissued, his ongoing work with Suicide, and his recent collaborations with French artist Divine Enfant.

    I’M BASICALLY A ROCK ’N’ ROLL BORN AND BRED PERSON. But in 1970, when I started Suicide with Alan Vega, minimalism was the general atmosphere; Stockhausen and German

  • interviews August 20, 2012

    Steve Roden

    Steve Roden is a Los Angeles–based sound and visual artist. His recent work can be seen in the group exhibition “Silence” at the Menil Collection in Houston, which runs through October 21; it will be on view at the Berkeley Art Museum January 30 to April 28, 2013. Here, Roden discusses the process of incorporating the works of John Cage and Walter Benjamin into his own art.

    LAST YEAR, I PERFORMED John Cage’s 4'33" every day, privately––never announcing it to anybody else. It was an exercise in both writing and listening, but also an activity to see how the score could be opened up to offer

  • interviews March 26, 2012

    Josh Melnick

    Josh Melnick is a New York–based artist and filmmaker whose video portraits of seemingly frozen passengers on the New York City subway, The 8 Train, was commissioned by Art in General in 2009. A recently published book, designed by Project Projects and edited by Angie Keefer, expands upon this work and offers essays as well as interviews with luminaries such as Walter Murch, Lawrence Weschler, and Sharon Salzberg on time, consciousness, and the nearly imperceptible.

    I WANTED TO MAKE A BOOK that builds upon the ideas underpinning the 8 Train installation, and it was important to me to create