David Rimanelli

  • David Rimanelli on Jean Baudrillard’s “What Are You Doing After the Orgy?”

    The fascination of the pictures is the fascination of being seduced by a dead object, it is the magic of disappearance, and this particular magic can be found just as easily in pornographic images as in Modern art, where the prevailing obsession has been to literally not be viewable, to defy any and all possibilities of visual seduction.

    —Jean Baudrillard, “What Are You Doing After the Orgy?”

    IT WAS ANOTHER MOMENT, now impossible to reconstruct, a mix of naïveté and cynicism, philosophy and excess, that spawned Jean Baudrillard’s appearance in these pages during the 1980s. French poststructural

  • Jacqueline Humphries

    In our troubled economy, some people are putting their money into gold. How’s silver doing? In her latest series of abstract paintings, Jacqueline Humphries continues to mine the pictorial and affective valences of silver metallic paint, which appears as the ground in all the pictures. Humphries is someone for whom the political and philosophical questions of representation matter—a critical rather than unambiguously “feeling” type. But vivid, even uncomfortable feelings continue to pull at you, to nag in spectral and parodistic ways. The element of parody does not evacuate emotion;

  • David Rimanelli

    DAVID RIMANELLI

    IN PAINTING AS IN LIFE, Forrest Bess was a man who acted on his visions in an extremely direct way. In addition to creating a body of small, seemingly abstract paintings that faithfully replicated images he saw behind his closed eyelids, Bess engaged in at-home self-surgery, making an incision in the underside of his penis with a razor blade and creating a new orifice. Bess’s dealer throughout the 1950s and ’60s, Betty Parsons, declined to exhibit his medical research into androgyny, alchemy, and immortality alongside his paintings as the artist had requested. But in the current

  • Edward Hopper

    Hopper does the Continent: It has the ring of screwball comedy, somehow, but perhaps isn’t as incongruous as it sounds, since the paragon of repressed Yankee reticence has a way of finding common ground with modernists of all stripes and extractions. In this comprehensive exhibition, a coproduction of the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza (where it’s to open next month) and the Réunion des Musées Nationaux­ Grand Palais in Paris, expect sixty-five of the American realist’s paintings and engravings supplemented with works by those with whom he is most frequently

  • Jeff Koons

    Though Jeff Koons is certainly no stranger to Basel, this summer the Fondation Beyeler offers Switzerland its very first—believe it or not—museum presentation of the art-world icon’s work.

    Though Jeff Koons is certainly no stranger to Basel, this summer the Fondation Beyeler offers Switzerland its very first—believe it or not—museum presentation of the art-world icon’s work. It’s possible that the shock value climaxes with this fact, however, as, within these tasteful precincts, no pieces from the fractious and fascinating “Made in Heaven” series—artist and porn-star paramour in flagrante delicto, immortalized in miscellaneous sculptures and bemusingly pimply photographs—will be offered for public view. But the ready-

  • Richard Pousette-Dart

    Richard Pousette-Dart was there right at the beginning. Though he is known for his paintings from the 1980s, which glow with pointillist orbs and spiritual awakenings, this exhibition, organized by Christopher Wool, of paintings and sculptures made in Pousette-Dart’s East River studio during the ’40s and early ’50s, reminds us that he was the youngest of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Some of these paintings have never been shown publicly, and others have not been shown since their initial exhibition at Betty Parsons’s gallery in the ’40s. The opening of this crypt thus exposes

  • Damien Hirst

    With the recent death of Lucian Freud, some might argue that Hirst is now the greatest living British artist.

    With the recent death of Lucian Freud, some might argue that Hirst is now the greatest living British artist. And indeed—having given us such sensational icons as The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living (aka the Shark), 1991, and various farm animals, some bisected, vitrinized, and suspended in formaldehyde—there’s no question that he caters amply to the British appetite for showmanship. These works may sound ghoulish, but Hirst’s oeuvre is, of course, also splendidly carnivalesque: One could cite the spot and spin paintings, canvases

  • “La Carte d’après nature”

    In his preface to the 1800 edition of Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth announces the necessity for a new kind of poetry. He resolves to “choose incidents and situations from common life, and to relate or describe them, throughout, as far as was possible in a selection of language really used by men, and, at the same time, to throw over them a certain colouring of imagination, whereby ordinary things should be presented to the mind in an unusual aspect.” More than two centuries later, his then-revolutionary literary objective resonates throughout “La Carte d’après nature,” an expansive group exhibition

  • “Maurizio Cattelan: All”

    For his contribution to this year’s Venice Biennale, Maurizio Cattelan perched two thousand formaldehyde-preserved pigeons over the entrance and among the rafters of the Central Pavilion. A parody of the art apparatchiks who flock to the Giardini during the exhibition preview—as predictably as pigeons gather (and shit) in the Piazza San Marco—The Others, 2011, is classic Cattelan. At the Guggenheim, curator Nancy Spector has orchestrated a full onslaught of the artist’s characteristic satire, in a midcareer retrospective that brings together nearly 130 of

  • Jean Paul Gaultier

    Applauding one of fashion’s most enduring enfants terribles, this retrospective, subtitled “From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk,” will parade nearly 130 ensembles from Gaultier’s many couture and prêt-à-porter collections from as early as 1976.

    Remember the ’80s? No, not the art, but what you might have worn to the art openings and the clubs, the bars, the chichi restaurants: the whole glittering, louche shebang. For many who aspired to cutting-edge glamour, this meant wearing Jean Paul Gaultier. Applauding one of fashion’s most enduring enfants terribles, this retrospective, subtitled “From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk,” will parade nearly 130 ensembles from the designer’s many couture and prêt-à-porter collections from as early as 1976. Supporting materials will abound, including sketches, as well as

  • “Tracey Emin: Love Is What You Want”

    Tracey Emin’s “Tent” may be missing, but this show should provide a much-needed corrective to the view that it was the only notable work of art she ever made.

    Tracey Emin remains emblematic of the YBA generation, though possibly the most memorable work she’s made—Everyone I Ever Slept With 1963–1995 (aka “The Tent”), 1995—was destroyed in a warehouse fire. Emin declined to re-create the piece, so although it was one of the most sensational objects in “Sensation,” the 1997 survey of the YBAs at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, perforce it doesn’t figure in this retrospective of her work. What the career-spanning exhibition does offer, however, are some 150 works from the early ’90s to the present,

  • George Condo

    YOU WANT TO DIE. Me too. It’s something we share from the old days, a time sunk in the manic-depressive dependence that prefigures memory. George Condo paints his leering faces and tangled lines over the body of this long-submerged past, picking up its fragments of trailing, rotted flesh as they float to the surface and pasting them into the ongoing pastiche his survey has defined as “Mental States.” This past is also a destination, one that tortures, even humiliates, but will ultimately seduce us with its certainty. Invoking a death drive on autopilot traveling toward the nirvana of stasis,

  • George Condo

    George Condo appeared on the international art scene in the early 1980s with a series of phony old-master paintings, works that borrowed from canonized techniques to render disfigured portraits, subsuming the apparently contradictory tendencies of the moment: a resurgence of figurative painting and a predominant critical discourse on appropriation.

    George Condo appeared on the international art scene in the early 1980s with a series of phony old-master paintings, works that borrowed from canonized techniques to render disfigured portraits, subsuming the apparently contradictory tendencies of the moment: a resurgence of figurative painting and a predominant critical discourse on appropriation. At the time, the lines between the two camps seemed solid; in hindsight, the distinctions have grown murky. This exhibition, co-organized by the New Museum and the Hayward Gallery, will portray an artist ahead

  • Jeff Koons

    On the occasion of a 2006 exhibition of his work at the Serpentine Gallery in London, Jeff Koons spoke to journalist Farah Nayeri about one of the infamous pictures from the “Made in Heaven,” 1990–91, series depicting the artist and Ilona Staller (aka Cicciolina), his then-soon-to-be-ex-wife, in scenes of intimate joy and compromise: “I always liked this painting,” he said with a straight face. He then praised the pimples on Staller’s backside and explained how the work conveyed a “removal of cultural guilt and shame.”

    Twenty years after the debut of the series at the 1990 Venice Biennale, “Made

  • Lawrence Rinder’s Revenge of the Decorated Pigs

    Revenge of the Decorated Pigs: A Novel, by Lawrence Rinder. Portland, OR: Publication Studio. 258 pages. $20.

    LAWRENCE RINDER’S CAREER TRAJECTORY has followed anything but a preordained path. After all, who would have wagered that this ripped Studio 54 busboy with a master’s degree from Hunter College would have ended up as a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York? And when he organized the museum’s almost universally disparaged 2002 biennial—“the Bland Biennial,” in Jerry Saltz’s words—and subsequently failed to survive the Max Anderson–to–Adam Weinberg regime change

  • Jonathan Meese: Sculpture

    Jonathan Meese: Either you love this German multimedia artist—or you despise him.

    Jonathan Meese: Either you love this German multimedia artist—or you despise him. There seems to be no middle ground between cultish adoration and contempt. Perhaps this midcareer survey, Meese’s first major museum show in the US, will provide a welcome opportunity for a more balanced estimation of the artist’s qualities. Rather than feature his expressionistic, dirty-looking paintings, the MOCA exhibition focuses chiefly on his sculpture: massive, heaving bronzes reflecting various obsessions (certain fictional characters and film stars; his mother). The exhibition

  • Sean Landers

    ANOTHER WEEKEND SPENT in bed watching television and feeling sickish. I watched so much TV I started to think the TV was talking to me, enumerating my every fault, pointing out my moral defects and character flaws, my incapacity for taking up a lifestyle of healthful foods and regular exercise appropriate to someone my age, the moth holes in my once best sweater, and the reasons I’m a bad son. I interpolate this commentary through the nonstop chatter provided by the wronged and wayward women on the Lifetime Movie Network, through George Sanders and Bette Davis’s repartee in All About Eve, through

  • Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres/Ellsworth Kelly

    The catalogue, in English, French, and Italian, includes essays by the curator and Carter Foster.

    An exhibition bringing together Neoclassical paragon Jean-Auguste- Dominique Ingres (1780–1867) and modernist master Ellsworth Kelly (born 1923)? Sounds like a reach, but then consider that both artists are epicures of the curve, whether an odalisque’s back or the curve qua curve. Conceived by Éric de Chassey for the Villa Medici— where Ingres was a pensionnaire from 1806 to 1810 and director from 1835 to 1841—the installation is designed in collaboration with Kelly and features six of the living artist’s recent monumental reliefs juxtaposed with resonant portraits by

  • Michael Joo

    It stands to reason that pretty much everybody knows what a zebra looks like, either from photographs or the zoo, a tourist safari or Animal Planet. This was obviously not always the case, as for instance when George Stubbs painted the zebra that had been imported to England in 1762 by Sir Thomas Adams as a gift to Queen Charlotte, who kept a collection of exotic animals in the park of Buckingham House (as the palace was then known). In his most recent exhibition, Michael Joo took Stubbs’s 1763 painting of this zebra as the inspiration for three sculptures. The artist makes direct reference to

  • Otto Dix

    The Neue Galerie adds to its roster of distinguished exhibitions with the first American solo museum show of Otto Dix (1891–1969).

    The Neue Galerie adds to its roster of distinguished exhibitions with the first American solo museum show of Otto Dix (1891–1969). The German artist’s paintings and works on paper, which traverse Expressionism, Neue Sachlichkeit, and Berlin Dada, give a vivid and terrifying image of trench warfare (which the artist had experienced firsthand, having enlisted at the outbreak of World War I) and illuminate the queasy yet fascinating milieu of the Weimar Republic. (Paintings like The Dancer Anita Berber, 1925, contribute mightily to the come-to-the-cabaret image-repertoire of