David Rimanelli

  • Tim Burton

    The Museum of Modern Art’s Tim Burton retrospective includes screenings of his entire corpus of film features, from Peewee’s Big Adventure (1985) to Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007), as well the early shorts Vincent (1982).

    The Museum of Modern Art’s Tim Burton retrospective includes screenings of his entire corpus of film features, from Peewee’s Big Adventure (1985) to Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007), as well the early shorts Vincent (1982)—a black-and-white stop-motion film about a young boy obsessed, like Burton, with Vincent Price, who provides the narration—and Frankenweenie (1984), starring Shelley Duvall. These shorts presage Burton’s preoccupation with the bizarre and the “gothic,” as well as his predilection for oddball stars, not

  • Mike Kelley and Michael Smith

    This show, organized by SculptureCenter together with West of Rome Public Art in Los Angeles, features a new collaborative installation by Kelley and Smith, A Voyage of Growth and Discovery, 2009.

    Both Mike Kelley and Michael Smith are known for works in performance and video art, and both consistently return to the dark substrata of American popular culture for aesthetico-conceptual inspirational dread. This show, organized by SculptureCenter together with West of Rome Public Art in Los Angeles, features a new collaborative installation by Kelley and Smith, A Voyage of Growth and Discovery, 2009. In addition to an eighteen-foot-high baby made from junk, and a playground, the installation features a four-channel video that stars Smith’s character Baby Ikki visiting

  • Nate Lowman

    In his second solo show at Maccarone, Nate Lowman presented an exhibition in two parts, the first of which devolved on the Smiley Face icon. This installation consisted mostly of paintings that clustered tightly on two walls of the gallery’s expansive front room. The artist’s obsessive elaboration of the Smiley Face icon in multifarious guises and contexts derives from its original appearance in his inaugural solo show. Lowman then exhibited a painting of the signature of O. J. Simpson taken from a letter Simpson sent to fans shortly after his arrest—“Peace and Love O. J.” Within the O of his

  • “Andreas Gursky: Werke/Works 80–08”

    Gursky appeared more brazen and daring in his excursuses through the business and pleasure worlds of soi-disant late capitalism. With some 130 images, this exhibition traces the full sweep of his career.

    For a while, Andreas Gursky seemed special—the leader of the pack among Bernd and Hilla Becher’s students, who in the 1990s reformulated Conceptual photography as a dramatic as well as exacting enterprise. Gursky appeared more brazen and daring in his excursuses through the business and pleasure worlds of soi-disant late capitalism, perhaps because with his shift to digital techniques in the early ’90s, he indulged the extremes of the large-scale photograph. This touring exhibition—organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery, Germany’s Kunstmuseen Krefeld, and the Moderna

  • James Ensor

    Skeletons, masks, and puppets are mainstays of Ensorworld iconography, and yet for all his trafficking in lurid mayhem and morbidity, Ensor nevertheless suspires an air of transcendence.

    James Ensor (1860–1949), the Belgian Symbolist and proto-Expressionist, is a perennial favorite among people with the right taste. One of the very tippy-top paintings in any American collection is his—Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889, 1888, at the Getty. Sadly, that work will not travel here, although the show does feature the Museum of Modern Art’s no less iconic Masks Mocking Death, made the same year. Skeletons, masks, and puppets are mainstays of Ensorworld iconography, and yet for all his trafficking in lurid mayhem and morbidity, Ensor nevertheless suspires an

  • “One Image May Hide Another: Arcimboldo, Dalí, Raetz”

    “One Image May Hide Another” takes as its subject the many artists of various periods who have, through their work, explored embedded or reflective meanings.

    “One Image May Hide Another” takes as its subject the many artists of various periods who have, through their work, explored embedded or reflective meanings. Curators Jean-Hubert Martin, perhaps best known for his 1989 exhibition “Magiciens de la Terre,” at the Centre Pompidou, and Dario Gamboni, author of The Destruction of Art: Iconoclasm and Vandalism Since the French Revolution (1983), have assembled some 250 artworks for this ambitious exhibition. Presenting a visual and conceptual tour through composite, hidden, and reversible pictures,

  • “Alighiero & Boetti: Putting Art in the World”

    Breaking with arte povera in the early 1970s, Alighiero Fabrizio Boetti renamed himself Alighiero & Boetti, legally bifurcating his identity to reflect opposing or unresolved aspects of his oeuvre (e.g., the antinomies of order and chaos, West and East, authorial ego and collective processes) as well as his split relationship to the world as an artist.

    Breaking with arte povera in the early 1970s, Alighiero Fabrizio Boetti renamed himself Alighiero & Boetti, legally bifurcating his identity to reflect opposing or unresolved aspects of his oeuvre (e.g., the antinomies of order and chaos, West and East, authorial ego and collective processes) as well as his split relationship to the world as an artist. For this exhibition, curator Achille Bonito Oliva (in collaboration with the Boetti Archive and the Alighiero e Boetti Foundation) will assemble some seventy of the artist’s tapestries, maps, pieces of mail art,

  • Ugo Rondinone and Martin Boyce

    This two-artist exhibition should help corroborate SculptureCenter's renascence, after its longish quiescent period, as a major venue for contemporary exhibitions in New York.

    This two-artist exhibition should help corroborate SculptureCenter's renascence, after its longish quiescent period, as a major venue for contemporary exhibitions in New York. If all goes well, the results should be plastic-fantastic-inevitable. Martin Boyce is known for taking fluorescent tubes into metaphoric places that would give Dan Flavin the shudders, and this show promises, among other things, a suspended spiderweb-like sculpture made out of, you guessed it, standard-issue fluorescent tubes. Ugo Rondinone, no stranger to the pretty, the perverse, the grotesque, and

  • Elizabeth Peyton

    What becomes a legend most? Nowadays, the grandest compliment that fine art pays to glamour and celebrity might be Elizabeth Peyton's portraits. Bringing together more than one hundred works, the New Museum surveys fifteen years of the artist's career.

    What becomes a legend most? In the 1970s, Lillian Helman clad in a Blackglama mink did the trick. Nowadays, the grandest compliment that fine art pays to glamour and celebrity might be Elizabeth Peyton's portraits. In a rather different but perhaps no less resonant way, Peyton is as much a signature artist of the '90s as Matthew Barney, the subject of a recent Peyton portrait—and, given her proclivity for skinny, languorous, seemingly lipstick-besmirched ephebi, an uncharacteristic one. Bringing together more than one hundred works, the New Museum surveys fifteen years

  • Leigh Bowery

    This exhibition, organized by Martin Engler, includes photographs by Fergus Greer, Johnny Rozsa, and others; one (perhaps more) of Freud's paintings; two films starring Bowery; and several original costumes.

    Artist is an inadequate term for Leigh Bowery (1961–1994). Australian-born and London-notorious, he epitomized trans-everything: He was a terrifyingly inspired performer, a “fashion-forward” designer/mode, a renegade nightclub impresario, and a noted Lucian Freud model, among other things. That Bowery typically enacted these roles within a “queer” context was not accidental, but it has perhaps been overemphasized. Bowery's riotous exploitation of his own real and ostensible sexual shenanigans leaves homosexuality—maybe any sexuality—rather up in the air, whether as

  • Jack Pierson

    Jack Pierson first came to broad attention in the early 1990s, when the art market was at its nadir and much of the freshest new art reflected correlative tempers of depletion, disappointment, and disarray.

    Jack Pierson first came to broad attention in the early 1990s, when the art market was at its nadir and much of the freshest new art reflected correlative tempers of depletion, disappointment, and disarray. Almost twenty years after his first involvement with those “period” aesthetic derelictions, Pierson is certainly an art star, though his concerns remain pretty constant: stardom, loneliness, despair, desire, etc. Curator Richard D. Marshall wants to curtail the redundancy of dwelling on the artist's well-known themes in this monographic survey, which includes

  • Ferdinand Hodler

    Ferdinand Hodler (1853–1918) was born in Bern, so this retrospective honors a native son, even if Hodler's artistic life didn't really begin until he moved to Geneva, where he studied with Barthélemy Menn, a friend of Corot's and pupil of Ingres's, and first came into contact with French and Belgian Symbolism.

    Ferdinand Hodler (1853–1918) was born in Bern, so this retrospective honors a native son, even if Hodler's artistic life didn't really begin until he moved to Geneva, where he studied with Barthélemy Menn, a friend of Corot's and pupil of Ingres's, and first came into contact with French and Belgian Symbolism. After encountering Pierre Puvis de Chavanne's painting, Hodler sloughed off the influence of Courbet's realism, fashioning his own somnolent-poetical transalpine style, epitomized by Die Nacht, 1889–90, a highlight of the Kunstmuseum Bern's

  • 2008 Whitney Biennial

    These days, biennials around the world come and go with such banal frequency that one is tempted to regard them foremost as another dire way of marking the passage of time. “How many more of these fanfaronades shall I see before death?” weary international art-world power brokers and factotums might well wonder. Even so, globalism notwithstanding, two of these exhibitions retain a certain anticipatory excitement, however much they are typically despised: Venice and the Whitney. The seventy-fourth installment in the series of annual and subsequently

  • David Rimanelli

    LAST SUMMER, I visited my parents’ house, specifically to check out the condition of the hundreds of books I had left in storage years ago. There in the mercifully dry basement I found two separate stacks of boxes, one containing my mother’s old books and the other, mine. In one of her boxes I discovered a faded copy of William Empson’s classic work of literary criticism Seven Types of Ambiguity (1930): It was the first New Directions paperback edition, priced at $1.85. This book, like many from my mother’s library, had always fascinated me as a child, long before I ever read a word of it. It

  • Francesco Vezzoli

    The centerpiece of this retrospective—roughly fifty paintings, embroideries, and films (the medium for which he is best known)—is Vezzoli’s 2006 Marlene Redux: A True Hollywood Story!, a reformulation of Maximilian Schell’s 1984 documentary on Marlene Dietrich, commissioned by supercollector François Pinault and here making its North American debut.

    True Hollywood stories typically begin in places like Lawton, Oklahoma, hometown of Joan Crawford, but Sophia Loren and Francesco Vezzoli jump-started theirs in Italia. Vezzoli has always been attracted to glamour and stardom, although few viewers outside Italy would know the subjects of his early diva extravaganzas. (Iva Zanicchi or Valentina Cortese ring a bell?) Lately he has gone for the more easily recognizable—Catherine Deneuve, Courtney Love, Helen Mirren, and Sharon Stone. The centerpiece of this retrospective—roughly fifty paintings, embroideries, and films (the

  • Matthew Barney

    The Serpentine show consists of some thirty works, including sculptures, installations, performances, drawings, and films from the ongoing “Drawing Restraint” series.

    If a single artist could be said to have defined the 1990s, it would probably be Matthew Barney. After the culmination of his “Cremaster” shebang in his 2003 retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, many skeptics wondered, Well, now what? But Barney’s most recent feature film, Drawing Restraint 9, 2005, amply demonstrates his continued aesthetic fecundity. The Serpentine show consists of some thirty works, including sculptures, installations, performances, drawings, and films from the ongoing “Drawing Restraint” series. Several large sculptures related

  • Richard Prince

    Richard Prince now reigns as one of the most influential figures for young artists drawn to his cunning amalgams of grunge and glamour, conceptual spark and pop-cultural savvy.

    Richard Prince has in recent years become one of the inescapable artists of our time—a fascinating development, given that for years his work seemed to appeal to only a coterie, whereas some of his Pictures peers quickly secured critical approbation and visibility. Prince now reigns as one of the most influential figures for young artists drawn to his cunning amalgams of grunge and glamour, conceptual spark and pop-cultural savvy. This retrospective includes some 175 of the artist’s works, among them his “Gangs” photographs, “Nurse” paintings, and “Hoods” sculptures. The

  • Wilhelm Reich

    Depending on one's point of view, Wilhelm Reich was either a renegade crackpot psychoanalyst or a visionary sociopsychological theorist and countercultural hero. He joined Freud's circle in 1920, but his political militancy and unorthodox writings soon alienated him from the established psychoanalytic community. He remains best known for his body-oriented psychology, with its theories regarding the liberating power of the orgasm, and his hypothesis of a universal life energy he called orgone. Johler's survey of Reich's life and work amasses three-hundred-odd objects and

  • THE RETURN OF OP

    With two major survey shows on Op art running almost concurrently in Europe and the United States, we asked contributing editor David Rimanelli and art historian Sarah K. Rich to assess the exhibitions and reflect on the resurgence of interest in—and contemporary resonance of—this long-moribund movement.

  • Philip-Lorca diCorcia

    Despite being one of the leading lights of the so-called Boston School, Philip-Lorca diCorcia has not been the subject of a museum exhibition in the United States since his star-making appearance at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1994. Finally, the ICA is mounting a midcareer survey—the largest selection of his pictures assembled to date—including 125 works from 1978 through the present. For many, diCorcia’s early ’90s “Hustlers” series remains the cynosure of his oeuvre. Portraying male prostitutes in Los Angeles, the photographs leak pathos, corruption,