Didier Eribon

  • Gilles Deleuze

    I

    THE SUICIDE OF PHILOSOPHER Gilles Deleuze at the beginning of November, after he had spent many years suffering from a terrible respiratory illness, was a gesture that struck many in France dumb. Deleuze’s thought, however resistant to summary, was above all an affirmation of the life force, of the will to life: “One’s always writing,” as he put it in Pourparlers (1990 [Negotiations, 1995]), “to bring something to life, to free life from where it’s trapped.” While there is something tragically unbearable about the willful death of a philosopher who always, in the final instance, exalted and