Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

  • Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

    IN MANY OF J. G. BALLARD’S NOVELS, the characters are left to wonder if they should stay or leave: “Are you going to stay on here?”1 When one is immersed in an overwhelming and intense environment like that of The Crystal World (1966), The Drowned World (1962), or The Burning World (1964)—or even that of an extreme high-rise, an abandoned highway, or a decaying leisure zone—whether to stay or leave becomes a very important question. All the more so when the environment itself slowly produces a new psychogeographic condition, seeming to contaminate all thoughts, dreams, and desires. The same

  • THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR

    13 SCHOLARS, CRITICS, WRITERS, AND ARTISTS CHOOSE THE YEAR’S OUTSTANDING TITLES.

    BRIGID DOHERTY

    I turned to Psyche: Inventions of the Other, Volume I (edited by Peggy Kamuf and Elizabeth Rottenberg; Stanford University Press) in connection with my attempts to look differently at what is made of thinking (and writing) in the art of Hanne Darboven, whose work has often been regarded (to my mind erroneously, or mostly erroneously) as an instance of “Conceptual art.” Psyche—which comprises translations of the first sixteen essays from a volume of Jacques Derrida’s writing that originally appeared