Douglas Fogle

  • slant February 12, 2020

    Great Expectations

    MY FIRST ENCOUNTER with the work of Derek Jarman was imageless. Or more precisely, it was sonorous: The artist voiced a text that was at once a celebration and a lament of a life of love and loss that accompanied a projection of pure azure: “In the pandemonium of image I present you with the universal Blue. Blue an open door to soul. An infinite possibility becoming tangible.”

    This was the director’s last feature, Blue, released in 1993, less than a year before his death from AIDS. As his disease progressed, he became partially blind and his vision would frequently be overtaken by a field of

  • DENIED PAROLE: THE ART OF RYAN GANDER

    SEEING JUST ONE or two isolated works by London-based artist Ryan Gander does not do justice to the diversity of his oeuvre, which includes objects, photographs, drawings, installations, films, novels, and lectures. He could perhaps be considered a sculptor in the most expanded definition of that term, but it would be more accurate to describe him as a forensic examiner whose reconstructions of modernity’s “crime scene” lead us to the intersections of the history of social systems (their failures and subversive adaptations, in particular) and everyday life. With each new project Gander carefully

  • Lars Nilsson

    Lars Nilsson is part of a generation of Scandinavian artists who came of age in the ’80s and have been largely overshadowed by the vogue for young artists from the region in the following decade.

    Lars Nilsson is part of a generation of Scandinavian artists who came of age in the ’80s and have been largely overshadowed by the vogue for young artists from the region in the following decade. Magasin 3’s fifteen-year retrospective survey offers something of a corrective. Curated by David Neuman, the exhibition presents thirteen major works by the Swedish artist, who is best known for his conceptually oriented sculptural installations investigating the vagaries of the masculine facade. As this is only the second time in its fourteen-year history that Magasin 3 has

  • Douglas Fogle

    IN THESE PAGES, ROBERT SMITHSON ONCE QUOTED Vladimir Nabokov’s observation that “The future is but the obsolete in reverse.” It is precisely this paradoxical sense of the future as a future anterior that pervades the work of Haluk Akakçe. Born in Ankara, Turkey, in 1970 and currently based in New York, Akakçe is a child of the digital revolution who works in a broad range of media, effortlessly moving from low-tech drawing and wall painting to, more recently, digitally animated video. But no matter the medium, Akakçe takes us through the looking glass into a world where the future is often