Ed Ruscha

  • the NEA

    IN SEPTEMBER 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed legislation that would establish the National Endowment for the Arts, the largest arts funder in the United States. In March of this year, President Trump proposed its elimination. While any immediate action has been forestalled, the threat to thousands of community organizations, museums, artists, and projects that benefit from NEA grants still looms. In light of this, Artforum asked five distinguished artists and critics to reflect on the NEA’s vital impact.

    JOHNIE SCOTT

    IN THE MONTHS immediately following the Watts riots in Los Angeles in

  • The Best Exhibitions of 2014

    TO TAKE STOCK OF THE PAST YEAR, ARTFORUM ASKED AN INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF ARTISTS TO SELECT THE SINGLE IMAGE, EXHIBITION, OR EVENT THAT MOST MEMORABLY CAPTURED THEIR EYE IN 2014.

    OSCAR MURILLO

    KIM GORDON

    LORETTA FAHRENHOLZ

    Broad City is the first TV show to fully exploit the comic potential of the gentrification of our minds.

    WOLFGANG TILLMANS

    LAURE PROUVOST

    This is an image from a book on Ferdinand Cheval’s Palais Idéal (1912). My family was recently seeking architectural inspiration for a museum that will be built when our lost granddad comes out of his conceptual tunnel. It has now been more than

  • Richard Artschwager

    ED RUSCHA

    WHEN I SAW Richard’s Formica works in the mid-1960s, I was amazed. There’s something about Formica—it seemed like the wonder surface of the day. (But it always made my palms itch.) Taking that on was a very brave thing for an artist to do. There must have been something in Richard that made him go for this new material. He saw some possibility in it and acted on it. The way he made the edges come together and mitered them: He was a master at that. And he was fortunate to have the skills of a finish carpenter; he knew all those little angles. He did lots of sharp corners and that

  • Ed Ruscha

    IN JULY, an exhibition of my work opened at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria. All four floors of the museum are related to my work with books. Everything from photography to film to paintings and drawings, and of course actual books—all of it is tied to my background in working with language and with graphic design.

    In fact, I was Artforum’s layout designer for a few years beginning in 1964, after the magazine moved from San Francisco to LA. I would work a long weekend about once a month, pasting the magazine together with rubber cement and scissors and all that. That was the analog world

  • ARTISTS ON L.A.:

    ELEANOR ANTIN

    David and I arrived in Solana Beach, a coastal town north of San Diego, after driving cross-country from New York in an old beat-up Caddy with our one-year-old son, Blaise. Robert Kennedy was dying of gunshot wounds in an LA hospital after winning the California primary, and it was twenty-four hours after Valerie Solanas shot Andy Warhol back in New York. A hot sunny day in June 1968, and there were huge juicy oranges in the back garden. A year later Manson and company went on their rampage in the Hollywood Hills, and the Hells Angels went on theirs at Altamont a couple of months

  • Ed Ruscha

    In the summer of 1962 Joe Goode and I hitchhiked from Los Angeles to New York, where we met Andy Warhol at his firehouse studio. He said, “Let’s go down and see Jim Rosenquist.” So we went down to Rosenquist’s studio on Coenties Slip—we were there for maybe an hour or so. I remember him working on a painting that had basketball players in it, called Painting for the American Negro. He had a wall phone with what seemed like hundreds of numbers tacked up around it. He had a really messy studio that was sort of perfect for what he was doing, with visuals all over the walls and floor.

    I connected