Eric Rentschler

  • Thomas Arslan, Gold, 2013, 35 mm, color, sound, 113 minutes. Emily Meyer (Nina Hoss).

    the 2013 Berlinale

    A FILM FESTIVAL is a unique kind of heterotopia, a marketplace that challenges its denizens to transform profusion and plenty into constellations that provide a coherent experience. Faced with four hundred films screened over ten days in February, accredited visitors at this year’s Berlinale had as ever to decide which sectors of the spectacle they would inhabit—in essence, to decide which of many possible festivals they would attend and, in the process, create. One chose from among features, documentaries, and short films in the main sections, Competition, Forum, Panorama, and Perspektive

  • Left: Alexander Kluge presenting the Oberhausen Manifesto at a press conference during the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany, February 28, 1962. Right: Wim Wenders, Alice in den Städten (Alice in the Cities), 1974, 16 mm, black and white, 110 minutes. Alice (Yella Rottländer) and Philip Winter (Rüdiger Vogler).
    film September 26, 2012

    Declaration of Independents

    Oberhausen Manifesto 1962: Short Films by the Signatories, 1958–67” runs at the Museum of Modern Art in New York from Thursday, September 27 through Sunday, September 30, 2012.

    A HANDFUL OF WORDS in large type filled a page of the West German journal Filmstudio’s spring 1962 issue. The editors’ telegraphic message—devoid of punctuation and eccentric in its line breaks—proclaimed:

    Papas cinema

    is dead mani

    festo of the yo

    ung 1962 ho

    pe or

    disaster

    By the time that issue of Filmstudio appeared, the manifesto in question was well known, even notorious, among observers of the film scene in

  • Alexander Kluge presenting the Oberhausen Manifesto at a press conference during the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany, February 28, 1962.

    DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENTS: THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE OBERHAUSEN MANIFESTO

    Oberhausen Manifesto 1962: Short Films by the Signatories, 1958–67” runs at the Museum of Modern Art from Thursday, September 27–Sunday, September 30, 2012.

    A HANDFUL OF WORDS in large type filled a page of the West German journal Filmstudio’s spring 1962 issue. The editors’ telegraphic message—devoid of punctuation and eccentric in its line breaks—proclaimed:

    Papas cinema

    is dead mani

    festo of the yo

    ung 1962 ho

    pe or

    disaster

    By the time that issue of Filmstudio appeared, the manifesto in question was well known, even notorious, among observers of the film scene in the Federal Republic

  • A CINEMA OF CITATION: THE FILMS OF ALEXANDER KLUGE

    I. BEHOLD THE COVER of Alexander Kluge’s most recent book, Cinema Stories,1 and you find yourself eye to eye with a gorilla guarding a slumbering woman, an image you take to be a production still from King Kong (but you’re wrong). The half-title page bears another unidentified photograph: Here a dashing man, with a nocturnal metropolis as his backdrop, embraces Catwoman (but no, it isn’t Halle Berry or Michelle Pfeiffer or Lee Meriwether). The table of contents lists thirty-nine tales, a mixed bag of titles ranging from the generic (“Cold Shower”) to the convoluted (“How We Cameramen Became