Fanny Singer

  • Delcy Morelos

    A chest-high wall created a corral or, perhaps, a stage. To enter the bounded space of Delcy Morelos’s earthen landscape Moradas (Dwellings), 2019, one had to pass through an opening and walk along a path of bare concrete. Coating the floor, a dried, shallow crust of dirt was host to an array of objects bearing telluric patinas. The white gallery walls and pillars were likewise covered to chest height, delineating a sharp horizon in a striking formal gesture that gave one the impression of being surrounded by a dark sea—or, alternately, of having been buried alive.

    The gathered objects—which

  • diary January 23, 2020

    Fog Machine

    FOR SEVEN YEARS, I’ve watched the art and design fair known as FOG recede and advance (last year, fifty-three galleries were present, this year a more manageable forty-eight); shift its art-to-design ratio (more art, less design); and beef up its ancillary programming (ten artist/curator talks in four days in the on-site auditorium). Taking place at the Festival Pavilion—the historic pier at San Francisco’s Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture––the fair features a considerable cadre of San Francisco galleries, or galleries with outposts in the city, and is disproportionately supported and visited

  • slant September 04, 2019

    Capps Lock

    THE FIRST ROOM OF “TIMESHARE,” Liz Magor’s recent exhibition at the 500 Capp Street Foundation, was dim and crowded with furniture, boxes, moving blankets, and stacked belongings. A narrow strait allowed visitors to thread through these items to the other side, to look back at the assembled contents of a life: treasures, jetsam, desiderata. A small white dog––fabricated from polyester resin––was sheltered beneath a table like a cowering sentry. The low light gave this most recent iteration of Magor’s ongoing installation One Bedroom Apartment, 1996–, a decidedly melancholic cast, redoubled by