Frances Richard

  • Runa Islam, Be The First To See What You See As You See It, 2004, still from a 16-mm film, 7 minutes, 30 seconds. Installation view.

    Runa Islam

    Runa Islam’s fascination with cinema as dispositif—an “apparatus” involving not just cameras and projectors but things like architectural frame, narrative structure, and phenomenological experience— guides this exhibition.

    Runa Islam’s fascination with cinema as dispositif—an “apparatus” involving not just cameras and projectors but things like architectural frame, narrative structure, and phenomenological experience—guides this exhibition, a co-production with the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney (where it will be on view from August 19 to November 11). Five or six pieces made within the past seven years are slated for each venue, including a joint commission by the hosting institutions whose working title is Magical Consciousness—a meditation on a gold-leafed Japanese

  • Kiki Smith

    Kiki Smith’s “Sojourn” is an ongoing site-specific installation, brought to Brooklyn in its fourth iteration (following stints at the Museum Haus Esters in Krefeld, Germany; the Kunsthalle Nürnberg, also in Germany; and the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona). Overflowing the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, this adaptation intervened in two adjacent period rooms, all part of the museum’s Major Henry Trippe House, built in Maryland circa 1730. This was apropos in that “Sojourn”—a meditation on mortality, inspiration, and cooperation in women’s lives—emerged from Smith’s encounter with

  • “Ecstatic Peace Poetry Journal Issue #10”

    Sonic Youth guitarist Thurston Moore founded Ecstatic Peace Poetry Journal in 2001. An offshoot of his label, Ecstatic Peace Records + Tapes, it was envisaged as a means of gathering downtown writers with affinities to art and music. Celebrating its tenth issue (coedited with Byron Coley and Eva Prinz), this show positioned the journal—proudly black-and-white and stapled—as faith keeper for the mimeo revolution of the 1960s and ’70s, when little magazines mushroomed in the East Village, North Beach, and points between. Arcing back to Charles Henri Ford’s 1940 volume of poems, ABC’s (with a cover

  • Anthony McCall

    Fold an art-world time line so that 1973 touches 2010. Task-based performance in its antimetaphorical directness—as undertaken by an artist in his twenties—will rub against technological spectacle in an elegiac mood, as engineered by an artist now over sixty. Structuralist cinema and post-Minimal sculpture will meet digital video and relational installation; ambient dust and cigarette smoke in a loft where cognoscenti gathered for experimental screenings will turn to vapor puffs emitted by a haze machine in a gallery, where QuickTime projections loop and passersby drop in. Yet key concerns

  • Sister Mary Corita

    The cover of Newsweek of April 12, 1965, shows a Vietnamese man, wearing only a pair of shorts, being pushed through a field by a helmeted American soldier. “Profile of the Viet Cong,” the caption reads. The man looks angry and desperate; the soldier’s face is turned away. The picture is included in news of the week, a 1969 serigraph by Sister Mary Corita, where it is washed in blood red. The poster’s lower third is tinted mint green, the contrasting colors buzzing urgently. At right in this green section, a Life magazine cover shows soldiers supporting a wounded comrade. In the center is stamped

  • Chris Ofili

    Although Chris Ofili’s recent show, “Afro Margin,” was grandly installed in one of David Zwirner’s soaring galleries, it consisted simply of a modest suite of eight pencil drawings, made between 2004 and 2007. The materials, too, were pared down in comparison with his previous work—no superheated color or reflective resins, no glitter, no elephant dung. This did not preclude the visual syncopation for which Ofili is famous. Still, “Afro Margin” emphasized, or resynthesized, two motifs long of interest to the British artist: the hypertrophic Afro head and the cascade of scintillant dots. Skillful

  • Kehinde Wiley

    “The master’s tools,” wrote the poet Audre Lorde, “will never dismantle the master’s house.” “Isn’t life a series of images that change as they repeat themselves?” asked Andy Warhol. If the master’s tools are portraits of kings, saints, and ornamental women garbed in the ermine and satin of their class; and if the corridors of power link the master’s house to the museum, where grand white men are shown making decisions and alluring white women signify the things decided; and if those portraits are repeated with young black men from the Fulton Mall in downtown Brooklyn standing in the place of

  • Gabriel Orozco, Horses Running Endlessly, 1995, wood, 3 3/8 x 34 3/8 x 34 3/8".

    Gabriel Orozco

    This show, organized by Ann Temkin, unpacks layered dualities with two decades’ worth of the New York–, Mexico City–, and Paris-based artist’s works–roughly one hundred sculptures, photographs, paintings, and installations.

    A cultural scavenger who shifts fluidly from feats of industrial fabrication to meditations on the handmade, the organic, and the abject, Gabriel Orozco is a master of the comic and wistful gesture. He is also a defining figure in that strain of semirecent art that frames aesthetic practice as nomadic, globalized: ethereal in meaning and value, yet material and indexical in form. This show, organized by Ann Temkin, unpacks these layered dualities with two decades’ worth of the New York–, Mexico City–, and Paris-based artist’s works–roughly one hundred sculptures, photographs,

  • Gordon Matta-Clark, documentation of Office Baroque, 1977.

    Gordon Matta-Clark

    In the city where his father, the Surrealist painter Matta, was born, the Museo de Arte de Lima and the MNBA bring Gordon Matta-Clark’s Chilean roots to bear in his first major South American survey.

    In the city where his father, the Surrealist painter Matta, was born, the Museo de Arte de Lima and the MNBA bring Gordon Matta-Clark’s Chilean roots to bear in his first major South American survey. Emphasizing Matta-Clark as a social interventionist, the show features letters, notes, and sketches alongside films, sculptures, and documentation of his cuttings, “anarchitectural” works, Fake Estates, Food, and other 1970s projects; the catalogue (in Spanish/English and Portuguese/English editions) continues the coverage with a selection of the artist’s

  • Dana Schutz

    “Missing Pictures” was Dana Schutz’s twelfth solo exhibition, and it’s time to stop appraising her as a prodigy. Neither instant nor sustained stardom has ruined her, and these twelve paintings evinced the same luxe, wack, et volupté she has been praised for before, with the same ambitious chewing up and spitting out of art-historical exemplars. Ten minutes in the gallery was time enough for a viewer to cycle through thoughts of Guston, Manet, Kandinsky, Picasso, Matisse, Bonnard, Rodin, and Johns—whose hatch marks Schutz has adapted as parquet flooring in a scene of periwigged Founding Fathers,

  • Carolee Schneemann

    Carolee Schneemann is an original, and a nexus. Lissome banshee-progenitrix of Body Art and downtown doyenne whose influences span the New York School, the Judson Dance Theater, and contemporary performance, she can connect, say, Joseph Cornell (she met him when she was around twenty) and Matthew Barney (see Up To And Including Her Limits, 1971–76, her drawing-in-a-harness performance). After fifty years and counting of exhibiting, she remains “Carolee, naked and maenadian,” as Lucy Lippard apostrophized her in 1979. “Painting, What It Became” at P.P.O.W., curated by Maura Reilly, surveyed the

  • Andrea Zittel

    Andrea Zittel’s exhibition “single strand, forward motion” followed two major surveys of her work: “Critical Space,” which toured the US and Canada in 2006 and 2007, and a retrospective of works on paper at Schaulager in Basel in 2008. Perhaps her slate felt clean. Or perhaps, since her home in Joshua Tree, California, aka A-Z West, has been a tourist destination and test site for about seven years now, she wanted to shift her terms; she might also be tracking an economically influenced curve away from high-finish collectibles toward faster, lighter experiments. In any case, this show was more