Frances Richard

  • Kate Gilmore

    Kate Gilmore recently exhibited four single-channel videos, all dated 2008. One of the filmed actions took place in the gallery, and the relevant television monitor was sited in the detritus of that performance; another includes two supporting players. Otherwise, all share the basic parameters she has established for her work. Never rehearsed, each piece is attempted only once, and stars only the artist. A self-imposed physical obstacle is quixotically assaulted—here, panels of drywall are punched and kicked through, and blocks of plaster and other junk are pounded with sledgehammers. In each

  • Roni Horn, You Are the Weather (detail), 1994–96, sixty-four color photographs and thirty-six black-and-white photographs, each 10 3/8 x 8 3/8".

    “Roni Horn aka Roni Horn”

    A welcome survey of Horn’s work tracks her thirty-year engagement with post-Minimalist form as a container for affective perception.

    A welcome survey of Horn’s work tracks her thirty-year engagement with post-Minimalist form as a container for affective perception. Expect selections from her cycles of “pair objects”; the complete 100-photograph installation of “You Are the Weather,” 1994–96; and—investigating the topography of Iceland as a landscape of libidinal folds and fissures—the artist’s book series “To Place,” 1990–. Newer pieces will include sculptures in glass, abstract word drawings, and a rubber-floored room. The accompanying publication promises a “Subject

  • Beatriz Milhazes

    This miniretrospective will present a dozen large-scale paintings and collages by Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes, including a substantial piece made specifically for the exhibition—all doubtless rendered in her signature carnival colors.

    This miniretrospective will present a dozen large-scale paintings and collages by Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes, including a substantial piece made specifically for the exhibition—all doubtless rendered in her signature carnival colors. With the Boulevard Raspail and the institution’s Lothar Baumgarten–designed gardens as backdrop, Milhazes will transform the front and back glass facades of the Fondation Cartier’s Jean Nouvel building into a translucent spectacle of collaged adhesive film. Inside, expect a further profusion of ornamental pastiche:

  • Arlene Shechet, Good Ghost, 2007, glazed ceramic, steel, cast concrete, 66 x 24 x 22".

    “Dirt on Delight: Impulses That Form Clay”

    This exhibition promises to parse a current vogue for sculpture’s most basic material—and, if we’re lucky, to pose larger questions about what it means to make objects at all now that de-skilled eclecticism has become its own cliché.

    Traditional Craft and medium-specific mastery meet the informe and neo-assemblage in “Dirt on Delight: Impulses That Form Clay.” A terrible name but a timely premise: The show promises to parse a current vogue for sculpture’s most basic material—and, if we’re lucky, to pose larger questions about what it means to make objects at all now that de-skilled eclecticism has become its own cliché. Twenty-two artists contribute more than seventy works scaled large and small. Innovative American potter George E. Ohr stakes out the historical horizon with

  • Jason Middlebrook

    “Shoulds” are dangerous, especially in art. So it’s risky to stipulate that a project concerned with human habits of exploiting and degrading flora and fauna should hit its viewers viscerally with exploitation and degradation, or that an exhibition worried about seductive consumerism should avoid seducing its consumers. Beauty, after all, is one of the great persuasive powers on earth. Sensually pleasing materials and precise compositions bespeak care and attention. Isn’t it ugly carelessness that causes landfills, shantytowns, deforestation, extinction, and mile after mile of freeway traffic

  • A. L. Steiner and robbinschilds, C.L.U.E. (color location ultimate experience), Part I, 2007, still from a color video, 10 minutes 48 seconds.
    picks December 22, 2008

    A. L. Steiner + robbinschilds

    The project called “C.L.U.E. (color location ultimate experience),” installed in the museum’s Shaft Project Space, comprises the following: a series of looped videos on monitors in the closet-size gallery, with a driving instrumental sound track playing softly and piles of rainbow-dyed clothing stashed here and there; a projection, on a wall outside the museum, of a related video accompanied by similar music on headphones, beginning daily at dusk and visible through a window in the stairwell beside the gallery; and intermittent performances by the choreographic duo in the videos. The dancers

  • Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn

    For their second New York show, Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn exhibited four videos, three dated 2008. This year’s Whitney Biennial saw them widely praised as well, making for an annus pretty mirabilis. Industriousness is apparently their M.O. In key ways, it’s also their subject. The duo continues to develop visions of citizenship and cooperation set in wastelands where concrete and curtain-wall, car batteries and plastic jugs remain, while the lifestyle of which such things are symptoms has collapsed. Far from marking nature/culture oppositions, civilization’s random leftovers—power cables,

  • Tetsumi Kudo, Your Portrait B, 1962, mixed media, 11 3/4 x 11 3/4 x 11 3/4".

    “Tetsumi Kudo: Garden of Metamorphosis”

    Viewers unfamiliar with the work of the late Tetsumi Kudo may be struck by how much the art looks of its era, and yet how plausibly it might have been made yesterday. Roughly one hundred objects from the 1950s through the ’80s will be displayed, with a “study room” presenting documentation and ephemera.

    Viewers unfamiliar with the work of the late Tetsumi Kudo—likely most Americans, since this will be his first solo show at a US museum—may be struck by how much the art looks of its era, and yet how plausibly it might have been made yesterday. Born in Osaka in 1935, Kudo belonged to a restless postwar generation coping with atomic trauma and headlong consumerism. When he moved to Paris in 1962, he synthesized Nouveau Réalisme, Pop, and Fluxus into elegiac, scatological assemblages, studded with mushroomy body parts. Roughly one hundred objects from the 1950s through the

  • Nadine Robinson, Tri-Christus, 2008, working drawing for site-specific installation on roof of SITE Santa Fe.

    SITE Santa Fe Biennial

    If insanity is doing the same thing and expecting a different result, curator Lance M. Fung hopes to make the seventh SITE Santa Fe Biennial sane.

    If insanity is doing the same thing and expecting a different result, curator Lance M. Fung hopes to make the seventh SITE Santa Fe Biennial sane. Principals from eighteen international organizations have been named to a curatorial team, including William Wells of Townhouse Gallery in Cairo, Tsukasa Mori and Yuu Takehisa from the Art Tower Mito in Japan, Guillermo Santamarina of El Museo Experimental El Eco in Mexico City, Joseph Sanchez from Santa Fe's own Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, and participants from Beijing, Warsaw, Vienna, and Seoul. These partners

  • Catherine Sullivan

    One can’t summarize Catherine Sullivan’s video Triangle of Need, 2007, but particulars can be given: The work was produced during residencies at the Walker Art Center and at Vizcaya, an opulent estate built in 1916 on Florida’s Bay of Biscayne by International Harvester magnate James Deering. Additional shooting was carried out in an abandoned apartment in Chicago (the city once home to the original factory of the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company [International Harvester’s parent company]). Sullivan collaborated, as she typically does, with an ensemble of actors and dancers, and with the

  • Tino Sehgal

    Given Tino Sehgal’s recent successes—mounting three exhibitions in as many years at the ICA in London; representing Germany at the 2005 Venice Biennale; and, last September, inaugurating what is billed as a “permanent evolving retrospective” at San Francisco’s CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts—it was difficult to approach This situation, 2007, unburdened by advance information. What one knew was likely to concern more than Sehgal’s self-described “constructed situations,” which are based on semiscripted actions by hired players. Anticipating his New York gallery debut, audiences had

  • Adrian Paci

    As befits an artist whose themes are displacement and memory, Adrian Paci’s recent New York gallery debut spanned two venues. One piece—a video made in 2002—had been seen in the city before. Another—a video from 2007—hinges on a trick that colors subsequent viewings. If one demands surprise, then, there were issues with the shows. But work concerned with the compulsion to revisit a vanished past, or to posit an impossible future, itself implies repetition.

    Shown at Peter Blum, the earlier video is Vajtojca (The Weeper). Paci shot it in Albania, which he left for Milan during the Kosovo war in