Gabriela Jauregui

  • picks February 05, 2018

    “Mothers of Men”

    What better way to celebrate than with friends: For its tenth anniversary, the gallery is hosting an exhibition of works by Moyra Davey, R. H. Quaytman, and Vivian Suter. The show addresses kinship and gender and is based on a yearlong correspondence between the three artists, all of them mothers of millennial sons, as they note in the press release. In addition to their own offspring, they also wrote to each other, starting in 2016 after a gathering in Athens, about what pills they take, the weather, dogs, and dust. The result of their exchange is an exhibition not just of three individuals

  • Yoshua Okón

    As the title indicates, Yoshua Okón’s exhibition “Miasma” deals with a sticky and disagreeable subject matter: CIA interventions in Mexico. But the political subject matter is handled from an oblique perspective, inviting viewers to fill in the blanks or question what they are seeing. In fact, without reading the exhibition text, one might never have noticed the connection between the work on view and the CIA’s activities in Mexico. It was clear, though, that the United States was a preoccupation of the artist’s: The first thing one saw on entering the gallery was an unframed photograph of a

  • Miguel Calderón

    Miguel Calderón’s first solo show in Mexico in eight years was met with both rumor and expectation. Some people thought he had dropped out of the art world and was focusing on music, films, or something else. His feature film, Zeus (2016), debuted at the Morelia Film Festival last year and touches on subject matter similar to that evoked by this exhibition, “Caída libre” (Free Fall), hosted by kurimanzutto off-site at a grimy warehouse space that Calderón once used as a studio. Not only did exhibition confirm Calderón’s presence in the Mexican art scene, it revealed how his work has matured

  • Fritzia Irízar

    Given that Fritzia Irízar’s recent exhibition “Golden Green - Greening Gold” focused on the mining of that most useless yet perennially attractive and signifying metal, its other principal element was something of a surprise: water. In Mexico, mining has been the source of tremendous ecological devastation, and the depletion of this substance is one of many recurring problems. In addition, nearly a third of the nation’s territory has been consigned to foreign companies for extraction, leading to the dismemberment of communities, the appropriation of territory without local consent, and the

  • José León Cerrillo

    I arrived at the gallery to find the lights still off, the door locked. No matter. A look through the windows revealed an exhibition made to be seen from the outside looking in. From the street, I could see a blue tennis-court floor cutting through the space, landing like a slanted pancake on top of the rooms. In some ways, this piece—Double Fault (all works 2016)—presented a visual paradox. Because it traversed more than one room, it couldn’t fully be comprehended from outside; the only way to understand it was to move through the space. Yet the exterior perspective was in other ways

  • Nairy Baghramian

    Nairy Baghramian’s first Mexican exhibition, “Hand Me Down,” reveals her ability not just to occupy but to play with space, rendering an institutional space intimate, bizarre, filling it with shards of bone or bits of organs that bring to mind bodies in a posthuman world. In this show, her work comprises three kinds of structures: five large, leather-covered resin sculptures in pale, dusty colors, hanging from the walls like lungs, chunks of brain, or soft prostheses, each titled Chin Up (all works 2015); bony, delicate, polished steel-and-silicone structures set on the floor like remnants of

  • “When In Doubt . . . Ask: A Retrocollective Exhibit of Mónica Mayer”

    As the retrocollective of the title suggests, the first retrospective of Mónica Mayer’s work will emphasize the collaborative nature of the Mexican artist, critic, and activist’s forty-year feminist art practice. Highlighting her engagements with such coconspirators as Victor Lerma and Maris Bustamante, the show will also underscore the importance of Mayer’s dialogue with north-of-the-border associates Suzanne Lacy and the members of Los Angeles’s Feminist Studio Workshop and Woman’s Building. Mayer made a habit of preserving so-called ephemeraas a political act,

  • picks October 19, 2015

    Juan José Gurrola

    Although Juan José Gurrola has suffered from relative anonymity outside specialized circles in Mexico, his work spans many genres—from theater and opera to painting and performance, not to mention a few precious films and collaborations with figures such as Alejandro Jodorowsky and David Hockney. For Gurrola’s current show at House of Gaga, Fernando Mesta, the space’s director, unearthed (literally) and restored two of the artist’s large-scale paintings, which are here presented with a fake flying bee that circles overhead.

    The installation works beautifully and includes video documentation of

  • picks August 03, 2015

    Jorge Méndez Blake

    Jorge Méndez Blake’s work has always incorporated architecture, books, and archive fever as a haunting exquisite corpse. Perhaps this is best distilled in his recent exhibition, “Topographical Transferrals from the National Library,” in Mexico City. Here the artist plays with the physical act of translation, which, as in his video The Topographer (Marking a Series of Points from the National Library to the University Museum of Contemporary Art), 2015, can be quite a painful and arduous process: In the piece, Méndez Blake attempts to move straight through the brush between the National Library

  • picks July 15, 2015

    Dr. Lakra

    As people gathered for the opening of “Monomito” (Monomyth), Dr. Lakra’s second solo exhibition at this gallery, one thing became clear: Lakra is an artist who straddles two worlds—of underground, punk-oriented transgressors and the contemporary art scene—simultaneously and with great success. No coincidence, surely, since “the tattoo is primal parent of the visual arts,” as Kathy Acker writes in Empire of the Senseless (1988). One could imagine Lakra uttering a very similar phrase.

    The adjective primal certainly comes to mind when entering this show as both a welcome surprise and a congruent