Giovanni Garcia-Fenech

  • news June 19, 2001

    BEAU MONDE TAKES BIENNIALS TO TASK

    BEAU MONDE TAKES BIENNIALS TO TASK

    What makes SITE Santa Fe’s fourth biennial so different? According to its curator, Dave Hickey, it’s the way it dodges what he sees to be the dominant biennial format: so-called “neutral” spaces with concrete floors, white walls, and industrial ceilings. “They’re essentially trade shows for the curators of museums and Kunsthalles the world over, who arrive at the site in search of internationally certified art installations to fill out their exhibition schedules,” says Hickey. “Beau Monde: Toward a Redeemed Cosmopolitanism” (www.beaumondesite.org), he claims, deals up a little old-fashioned

  • news May 09, 2001

    VOLKSBOUTIQUE HITS THE ROAD

    VOLKSBOUTIQUE HITS THE ROAD

    Brooklyn-based conceptual artist Christine Hill, fresh from last year's Pilot, the soup-to-nuts creation of a late-night talk show pilot culminating in the actual shooting of an episode at Ronald Feldman Gallery in New York, is hard at work on the latest installment of Volksboutique, a project that began as a secondhand clothing store in East Berlin that was later featured in Documenta X in Kassel in 1997. Volksboutique has evolved from its original concept to become a production house that sponsors and organizes Hill's other projects, which she refers to as “organizational ventures” in preference

  • news May 08, 2001

    THE ALDRICH MUSEUM CONSORTS WITH CRIMINALS

    THE ALDRICH MUSEUM CONSORTS WITH CRIMINALS

    The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Ridgefield, Connecticut (www.aldrichart.org), is taking a walk on the wild side with “Art at the Edge of the Law,” an exhibition of work by artists who question—and in some cases break—the law. Organized by Aldrich assistant director Richard Klein and the museum's curator Jessica Hough, the show opens June 3 and runs through September 9, 2001. The museum, however, is not planning on becoming an accessory to any crime. Prior to opening the exhibition, the museum consulted Larry Russ, former chairman of the Connecticut Bar Association Committee on Arts

  • news May 03, 2001

    MELLON FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES DIGITAL ARTS VENTURE

    MELLON FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES DIGITAL ARTS VENTURE

    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has announced the establishment of ArtSTOR, a major new nonprofit organization that will develop, maintain, and distribute digital resources for the study of art and related fields in the humanities. A counterpart to JSTOR (www.jstor.org), a venture established in 1995 to create a digital archive of leading scholarly journals and make them accessible online, ArtSTOR aims to offer online access to high-quality images, as well as archival and other related materials with the required integrity, depth, and coherence to be genuinely useful to scholars. Led by departing

  • news May 02, 2001

    BARD CENTER FOR CURATORIAL STUDIES HONORS PAUL SCHIMMEL

    BARD CENTER FOR CURATORIAL STUDIES HONORS PAUL SCHIMMEL

    The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (www.bard.edu/ccs) presented its Award for Curatorial Excellence to Paul Schimmel, chief curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, yesterday, Tuesday, May 1, at a ceremony at Riverside Church in New York City. Schimmel, who has been at MoCA since 1990, has organized influential shows such as “Helter Skelter: Los Angeles Art in the 1990s” (1992) and “Hand-Painted Pop: American Art in Transition, 1955–62” (1993). Previous honorees are Venice Biennale director Harald Szeemann (1998), New Museum founding director Marcia Tucker (1999),

  • news April 30, 2001

    STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM UNVEILS “FREESTYLE,” AND NEW SELF

    STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM UNVEILS “FREESTYLE,” AND NEW SELF

    It was a little over a year ago that the Studio Museum in Harlem brought in new director Lowery Stokes Sims, former curator of twentieth-century art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and deputy director Thelma Golden, previously a curator at the Whitney Museum, to revitalize the thirty-two-year-old institution. The results have finally been revealed with a major exhibition and a new look for the museum. “Freestyle,” which takes up the entire museum, presents new work by twenty-eight young black artists, including Laylah Ali, Rico Gaston, Kojo Griffin, Julie Mehretu, and Kori Newkirk.

    The show’s

  • news April 27, 2001

    BRAZIL DIVULGES GUGGENHEIM PLANS

    BRAZIL DIVULGES GUGGENHEIM PLANS

    Have the Guggenheim Museum’s Brazilian partners let the cat out of the bag too soon? According to press reports, Alfredo Sirkis, Rio de Janeiro’s secretary of urbanism, has revealed that Guggenheim officials have decided that the four Brazilian cities competing to host the newest branch of the museum—Rio de Janeiro, Recife, Salvador, and Curitiba—will all host affiliates of the increasingly far-flung museum empire. The new branches will reportedly feature Brazilian art they will circulate amongst them.

    So far Guggenheim officials are keeping a lid on the matter and have refused to confirm the

  • news April 26, 2001

    TURNER NOMINEE SUED FOR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT

    TURNER NOMINEE SUED FOR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT

    Turner Prize 2000 nominee Glenn Brown is being sued by science-fiction illustrator Anthony Roberts for copyright infringement. According to the Times of London, Brown used Robert’s cover illustration for Robert A. Heinlein’s Double Star as the source for his The Loves of Shepherds 2000. The Times was instrumental in the dispute when it originally contacted Roberts last year to inform him of the similarity between the works. At the time, the illustrator only expressed amusement. The Tate Gallery, which was exhibiting Brown’s work for the Turner Prize exhibition, responded by appending “After Tony

  • news April 25, 2001

    “INTERACTIVA ’01” BRINGS DIGITAL ART TO MEXICO

    “INTERACTIVA ’01” BRINGS DIGITAL ART TO MEXICO

    The art world has been abuzz recently with surveys of digital and Internet art, most notably the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s “010101: Art in Technological Times” and the Whitney Museum’s “BitStreams.” But if these exhibitions demonstrate the sophistication of many artists working with computer technology, they also highlight the inequality of access to technology around the world. In response to this growing digital divide, particularly outside the US and Europe, “Interactiva’s” definition of “new media” is an expansive one, and includes low-tech digital art made with relatively modest

  • news April 23, 2001

    TIM STONER WINS BECK’S FUTURES

    TIM STONER WINS BECK’S FUTURES

    Painter Tim Stoner has been awarded the second annual Beck’s Futures prize, Britain’s largest art award for “promising but unknown” artists. He will receive £24,000 of the £65,000 total value of the prize. Known for his ominous paintings of faceless revelers, Stoner, 30, was selected by a varied panel of judges chaired by Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum Bureau director Martijn Van Nieuwenhuyzen and composed of art critic Anthony Fawcett, Walker Art Center chief curator Richard Flood, Deste Foundation director Katerina Gregos, popular YBA painter Gary Hume, and Zadie Smith, author of White Teeth.

  • news April 19, 2001

    DOCUMENTA 11 DEBUTS IN VIENNA

    DOCUMENTA 11 DEBUTS IN VIENNA

    “Democracy Unrealized,” the first of five “platforms” leading up to Documenta 11 in Kassel next year (documenta.de), has been under way since March 15. Presented at the Academy of Fine Arts in the currently politically charged city of Vienna and running through April 20, the platform boasts participants as diverse as architect and curator Stefano Boeri, Alabama’s Southern Poverty Law Center director Mark Potok, philosopher Slavoj Zizek, and theorists Chantal Mouffe and Manuel De Landa. As has been previously announced, this and upcoming platforms are intended to confront the contemporary political

  • news April 18, 2001

    MCGONAGLE LEAVES IRISH MUSEUM

    MCGONAGLE LEAVES IRISH MUSEUM

    The five-month-old feud between the board at the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin and its director, Declan McGonagle, has finally reached a denouement. The board of the museum offered to renew McGonagle’s contract, but the first and as-of-yet only director of the museum has turned them down. In a statement released by the museum, McGonagle stated, “I have considered my position in these circumstances and I have decided my future lies elsewhere.” He added that he is currently discussing a severance package with a mediator, which London’s Sunday Times estimates to be approximately £200,000.