Hal Fischer

  • Steve Fitch

    The past few years have seen increased numbers of photographers working in the night landscape, using extended time exposure with combinations of strobe and ambient light. Darkness offers the possibility for greater control through the manipulation of light and provides an intense color saturation that can be employed for romantic or surreal effect.

    Steve Fitch has been photographing nocturnal imagery since the early ’70s, initially concentrating on roadside signs in his black-and-white images for Diesels and Dinosaurs. Now, in his Western landscape pictures, Fitch uses color. He transposes

  • James Finnegan, Christopher Brown, Stephen de Staebler

    In his recent sculptural tableaus, JAMES FINNEGAN probes into the ersatz Americana décor of fast food restaurants. Finnegan replicates ubiquitous formica counters, waste receptacles that spell “Thank You” in indented yellow letters, garish linoleum, “authentic” wood shingling, and plastic-brick wall covering that supposedly give these ’70s establishments personality.

    Thrust into the neutral gallery environment, these tableaus, re-created with exact and infinite detailing, become even more grotesque. Pacific coast regionalism is eccentrically acknowledged in a wood piling and rope counter area—a

  • Joan Brown

    Joan Brown’s most provocative paintings transform her own experiences into subject matter that seems universally significant. Originally part of the Bay Area figurative movement, Brown bypassed some of the self-indulgence that afflicted many of the other California artists who shared her autobiographical inclinations. Perhaps it was the risks she took as a painter that gave her work more meaning; she boldly pursued stylistic and formal questions in conjunction with the exploration of personal imagery. Whether it was the juxtaposition of two-dimensional decorative pattern against three-dimensional

  • Jack Fulton

    Jack Fulton’s narratives exist in the form of synthetic photographs; snapshot-styled images to which written puns, diaristic meanderings, paint, and collage have been added to black-and-white or color photographs. Fulton’s work germinated through his 1960s friendships with Funk artists. He adapted the eccentric personalism of William Wiley and the material playfulness of Robert Hudson to the photographic medium. Notations, either handwritten in the margins or snaking across the image in a deliberately awkward fashion, employ Joycean free association, phony phonetics (Peas on urth, civil-eyes-notion)

  • Raymond Saunders

    Raymond Saunders’ recent mixed-media works are fragmented reiterations of childhood memories, recent travels and black heritage. The strongest aspect of this work is the drawing. A repertoire of peculiar characters, some shaded in color, others with their faces partially scratched or masked, inhabit these pieces. At first glance they seem naive or childlike, but they do project eccentric and sometimes menacing personas reminiscent of George Grosz or Richard Lindner. The sketches are juxtaposed with found articles: illustrated pages from old nursery rhymes, school time cards, and words and numerals

  • Daniel Buren

    Aggressive, overbearing and inappropriate for the viewing of most art, the University Art Museum in Berkeley functions in the anti-art architectural tradition of the Guggenheim. The cast concrete, bunkerlike edifice holds six galleries whose bays project over a vast central exhibition hall. Ramps rising upward connect the gallery spaces that surround the central area.

    For six consecutive months installations by Daniel Buren, Robert Irwin, Carl Andre and Maria Nordman dominated this museum. Under the direction of Mark Rosenthal, the “Space As Support” program seems very much an attempt at positive

  • Robert Irwin

    Aggressive, overbearing and inappropriate for the viewing of most art, the University Art Museum in Berkeley functions in the anti-art architectural tradition of the Guggenheim. The cast concrete, bunkerlike edifice holds six galleries whose bays project over a vast central exhibition hall. Ramps rising upward connect the gallery spaces that surround the central area.

    For six consecutive months installations by Daniel Buren, Robert Irwin, Carl Andre and Maria Nordman dominated this museum. Under the direction of Mark Rosenthal, the “Space As Support” program seems very much an attempt at positive

  • Carl Andre

    Aggressive, overbearing and inappropriate for the viewing of most art, the University Art Museum in Berkeley functions in the anti-art architectural tradition of the Guggenheim. The cast concrete, bunkerlike edifice holds six galleries whose bays project over a vast central exhibition hall. Ramps rising upward connect the gallery spaces that surround the central area.

    For six consecutive months installations by Daniel Buren, Robert Irwin, Carl Andre and Maria Nordman dominated this museum. Under the direction of Mark Rosenthal, the “Space As Support” program seems very much an attempt at positive

  • Maria Nordman

    Aggressive, overbearing and inappropriate for the viewing of most art, the University Art Museum in Berkeley functions in the anti-art architectural tradition of the Guggenheim. The cast concrete, bunkerlike edifice holds six galleries whose bays project over a vast central exhibition hall. Ramps rising upward connect the gallery spaces that surround the central area.

    For six consecutive months installations by Daniel Buren, Robert Irwin, Carl Andre and Maria Nordman dominated this museum. Under the direction of Mark Rosenthal, the “Space As Support” program seems very much an attempt at positive

  • “Space as Support”

    Aggressive, overbearing and inappropriate for the viewing of most art, the University Art Museum in Berkeley functions in the anti-art architectural tradition of the Guggenheim. The cast concrete, bunkerlike edifice holds six galleries whose bays project over a vast central exhibition hall. Ramps rising upward connect the gallery spaces that surround the central area.

    For six consecutive months installations by Daniel Buren, Robert Irwin, Carl Andre and Maria Nordman dominated this museum. Under the direction of Mark Rosenthal, the “Space As Support” program seems very much an attempt at positive

  • Judy Chicago

    The Dinner Party, JUDY CHICAGO’s visual tribute to the history of women, is comprised of a 48-foot triangular table with 39 individual place settings. Each setting commemorates a female personage (either mythological or historical) with an abstract butterfly/vaginal motif. Plates rest on fabric runners embellished with needlework and weaving, illustrative of the history and culture surrounding that particular woman. The table stands on the “Heritage Floor,” white opalescent porcelain tiles inscribed with 999 women’s names in gold. Preceding this installation is a hallway of banners that pay

  • Victor Cohen-Stuart

    In Victor Cohen-Stuart’s work, painting traditions are played against sculptural intent, and an implied utilitarianism confronts fetishistic form. The materialistic vocabulary of these works is decidedly painterly—canvas, paint, wooden stretcher bars and string. But the objects realized, constructions that seem to tear away from their supports, are intentionally sculptural.

    Of the seven pieces in this current exhibition, the larger works, averaging 6 by 9 feet, emanate the most force. The objects are carefully fabricated, string and canvas organized in a way to suggest nautical apparatus or the