Hamza Walker

  • Steve McQueen

    An avowed formalist, Steve McQueen is also a child of Britain’s brand of early-1990s identity politics, which were a heady merger of race and postcolonialist discourse.

    An avowed formalist, Steve McQueen is also a child of Britain’s brand of early-1990s identity politics, which were a heady merger of race and postcolonialist discourse. While his recent leap from gallery to Cineplex is nothing short of remarkable, his feature films (Hunger [2008] and Shame [2011]) bear the same resolute visual sensibility and commitment to socio­political subjects that have characterized McQueen’s work from the beginning. For this survey, the artist-director has entered yet new territory with End Credits (part one), 2012—an almost eight-hour-long

  • 1000 WORDS: PETER SAUL

    WHAT DO YOU DO WITH PETER SAUL? He is an anomaly in relation to everything except himself, wearing his outsider status as a badge of honor. Indeed, it is perhaps his resolute consistency that most warrants our recognition today: Throughout artistic trends spanning from Pop to the present, he has remained a relative constant, making no bones about his skepticism toward the modernist underpinnings and antecedents of contemporary art. But despite his polemical parodies of such figures as de Kooning and Duchamp—just look at Double de Kooning Ducks and Donald Duck Descending a Staircase, both from

  • Hamza Walker

    1 “Sons et Lumières” (Centre Pompidou, Paris) Breaking the mold of hackneyed exhibitions addressing parallels between visual art and music (think of the tired example of painting and classical music—or worse, jazz), this exceptional show, curated by Sophie Duplaix and Marcella Lista and on view through January 3, instead examines relationships between light and sound. Broad? Yes. But generous enough to survey the whole of the twentieth century—from František Kupka to Pierre Huyghe—proposing it as a period of open-ended experimentation rather than ever-narrowing medium specificity.