Irene Small

  • Luis Camnitzer

    Writing on René Magritte’s famous pairing of an image of a pipe with the phrase CECI N’EST PAS UNE PIPE, Michel Foucault argued that the artist creates an “unravelled calligram,” in which text and image operate not in terms of glib resemblance but as a ruined tautology.

    Writing on René Magritte’s famous pairing of an image of a pipe with the phrase CECI N’EST PAS UNE PIPE, Michel Foucault argued that the artist creates an “unravelled calligram,” in which text and image operate not in terms of glib resemblance but as a ruined tautology. This formulation serves as an apt entrée to the work of Uruguayan Conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer, whose photographs, works on paper, installations, and mixed-media sculptures often force art, politics, and the viewing subject into similarly untenable semiotic confrontations. This exhibition and

  • Suprasensorial: Experiments in Light, Color, and Space

    Southern California’s role in postwar art is due for a critical reappraisal.

    Southern California’s role in postwar art is due for a critical reappraisal. Curator Alma Ruiz’s “Suprasensorial” constitutes a valuable contribution to this regionalist project, attempting a double reorientation by locating precedents of Californian Light and Space art of the late 1960s in the work of Latin American artists such as Lucio Fontana, who made his first neon environment in 1951. The exhibition will include five immersive installations—by Fontana, Julio Le Parc, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Jesús Rafael Soto, and Hélio Oiticica, the last in collaboration with Neville

  • 50th Anniversary of the Exhibition of Concrete Art

    This anniversary exhibition offers another vision of art’s entry into the social, one marked by a time when geometry was insistently, and optimistically, the order of the day.

    Although the 1st National Exhibition of Concrete Art in 1956 consolidated Brazilian constructivist trends, it also divided artists in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. The former group called for the rationalist integration of art and industry; the latter defended artistic autonomy and subjective expression. This retrospective tends toward integration, joining most pieces exhibited in 1956 with graphic art, furniture, and architecture from the era. Rio’s response to 1956 was Neo-concretism and, soon after, the radical social experiments of Lygia Clark and

  • Gego

    Gego’s constructions—abstract drawings, prints, and wire sculptures based on strategies of modularity, repetition, and dispersal—create a geometry that is mutable rather than fixed. The German-born Venezuelan artist’s first large-scale exhibition in Europe, co-organized with the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, brings together approximately one hundred works from the 1950s to the ’80s, grouped according to a logic of form rather than of chronology or genre. By installing the works in this way, Amor builds on what is most astonishingly palpable about a Gego piece: its

  • “Tropicália”

    “I CHOOSE TROPICÁLIA not because it is liberal but because it is libertine.” With this pithy turn of phrase, poet Torquato Neto put forth two of the Brazilian movement’s most provocative claims: first, that it provided an ideological alternative to defensive nationalisms, both Left and Right, in late-’60s Brazil; and second, that this alternative was constructed on an aesthetics of punning and resignification, a revaluing of words and positions, a flipping of public platforms into playgrounds that would invert the so-called predicament of Brazil’s tropical malaise into a vibrant cultural legacy

  • “Tropicália: A Revolution in Brazilian Culture”

    “Tropicália,” the poet Torquato Neto wrote, “is whatever is necessary.” We should get a sense of just how exhilarating “whatever” can be in this exhibition, which presents some 250 works produced during the influential Brazilian cultural movement of the late '60s.

    “Tropicália,” the poet Torquato Neto wrote, “is whatever is necessary.” We should get a sense of just how exhilarating “whatever” can be in this exhibition, which presents some 250 works produced during the influential Brazilian cultural movement of the late '60s. These are shown alongside contemporary responses by Marepe, Karin Schneider, and nine others. Highlights include Hélio Oiticica's seminal environment Eden, 1969, and television footage from 1968 of Os Mutantes singing in plastic suits. Accompanied by a catalogue containing an anthology of period texts, the

  • Artur Barrio

    In 1970, during one of the most violent periods of Brazil’s military dictatorship, Artur Barrio left plastic bags filled with meat, bones, excrement, and garbage on the streets of Rio de Janeiro, while an accomplice photographed passersby, capturing their curious, repulsed, and horrified reactions. For Barrio’s first solo exhibition in North America, curator Brian Wallace offers an unprecedented opportunity to view these and other photographs alongside some seventy objects, drawings, notebooks, and documentary material from the late ’60s to the present, including a new