Jacob Proctor

  • View of “Simon Fujiwara,” 2015. From left: Fabulous Beasts (Ocelot), 2015; Ich (2x7L Tangem 7 Trennsystem), 2015; Masks (Merkel E. 10, 1), 2015.

    Simon Fujiwara

    In his recent exhibition “Peoples of the Evening Land,” Simon Fujiwara stepped away from the overtly autobiographical subject matter for which he is best known. While the new bodies of work presented here were related to the context of his adopted home country of Germany, they tend to speak more to general conditions of the present than to personal memories of the past.

    Five sculptures took the forms of trash cans with pull-out rubbish separators, which are a common feature of German kitchens. Usually concealed within a kitchen cupboard, they were here placed atop white plinths. Their elevated

  • Zak Prekop, Transparency with Five Colors, 2014, oil on muslin, 96 × 64".

    Zak Prekop

    The nine new paintings in Zak Prekop’s third solo exhibition at Shane Campbell Gallery carry on the artist’s idiosyncratic project of process-based abstraction. Notably absent were the collaged paper elements and painted references to stretcher bars that had become familiar motifs in the artist’s recent work. This is not to say that Prekop has abandoned his recto/verso investigations, however. The majority of the paintings in the show were begun by applying passages of paint to one side of the canvas—or, in most cases, muslin—which Prekop then turned over and restretched so that the

  • Still from Paul Chan’s Happiness (Finally) After 35,000 Years of Civilization (After Henry Darger and Charles Fourier), 2000–2003, digital-video projection, color, sound, 17 minutes 20 seconds.

    Paul Chan

    AFTER A SERIES of increasingly high-profile solo exhibitions between 2003 and 2009, Paul Chan took a hiatus of sorts from the world of gallery and museum exhibitions to focus instead on writing and on his publishing imprint, Badlands Unlimited. This summer, Chan emphatically returned to public view with an exhibition that—despite its understated subtitle, “Selected Works”—looked and felt very much like a full-dress midcareer retrospective. Installed in twenty-four discrete spaces spread across Schaulager’s two main floors, and accompanied by an ambitious screening program of single-channel

  • Simon Starling, Bird in Space, 2004, Romanian steel plate, inflatable jacks, helium tank, hose, 6' × 20' 1/8“ × 11 5/8”.

    Simon Starling

    “Metamorphology,” the economical survey of Simon Starling’s work at the Museum of Contemporary Art, comprised just eleven works. But complementing the artist’s first retrospective at an American museum, an affiliated show that ran concurrently at the neighboring Arts Club of Chicago (titled “Pictures for an Exhibition”) additionally presented a major new, site-specific installation. Only a dozen works all told, yet each represents such a dense network of material, geographical, social, and historical narratives that one hardly needed more. The MCA exhibition began, appropriately enough, with

  • Aleksandra Domanović, Things to Come, 2014, UV prints on transparent polyester foil. Installation view. From the 2014 Glasgow International.

    2014 Glasgow International

    Although officially themeless, this year’s Glasgow International was nevertheless woven together by some common threads. It was the sixth edition of the festival and the first under the artistic direction of Sarah McCrory; as one has come to expect from such biennial undertakings, exhibitions and installations were spread throughout the city, occupying spaces ranging from major public institutions to such quirky, out-of-the-way venues as an underground parking garage, a vendor’s stall in a dilapidated shopping center, and a crumbling Edwardian community bathhouse.

    In many ways, Glasgow itself

  • Simon Denny

    From the television set’s changing form to the switch-over from analog to digital broadcasting, up through the evolving culture of the tech industry itself, Simon Denny mines the intersecting histories of media technology and cultural production, making sculptures, videos, installations, and events that often reflect in unexpected ways on the context of their exhibition. At Portikus, Denny—who is representing New Zealand in the 2015 Venice Biennale—revisits a pivotal moment in the history of Samsung Electronics known as the Frankfurt Declaration. In June

  • Paul Cowan, five works from the series “BCEAUSE THE SKY IS BULE,” 2013–, chroma-key blue paint on canvas, each panel 78 x 41".

    Paul Cowan

    In 1999, the writer of a letter published in the British magazine New Scientist claimed that reorganizing the letters in the middle of a word has little effect on its legibility, as long as the first and last letters are in the correct position. “The resaon for this,” the author suggested, “is suerly that idnetiyfing coentnt by paarllel prseocsing speeds up regnicoiton.” In his first solo outing at Shane Campbell Gallery, Paul Cowan brought this (incorrect) thesis and its textual demonstration to bear in the visual realm.

    In “Pallarel Procssieng,” Cowan presented seventeen paintings—fifteen

  • Amalia Pica, Venn Diagrams (Under the Spotlight), 2011, spotlights, motion sensors, text, dimensions variable.

    Amalia Pica

    Argentinean-born, London-based artist Amalia Pica has spent the past decade examining the ways in which personal and collective histories are perceived, transmitted, and represented in different cultural contexts, in particular the ongoing political and intellectual repercussions of European imperialism in South America.

    Argentinean-born, London-based artist Amalia Pica has spent the past decade examining the ways in which personal and collective histories are perceived, transmitted, and represented in different cultural contexts, in particular the ongoing political and intellectual repercussions of European imperialism in South America. Pica approaches such heavy-duty topics, as well as the uncertainties of communication at large, with a keen wit and an infectious sense of play, quietly undermining cultural myths and clichés and poetically exploiting the perpetual