Jan Avgikos

  • Lee Lozano

    Whenever one comes across Lee Lozano’s work (and the opportunities are few and far between), it’s immediately apparent that this artist is an important “missing link” within the complex overlays and undercurrents of the many art practices and attitudes that flourished in New York in the ’60s. As is evident in this valuable exhibition that brings together rarely seen paintings, drawings, and text pieces from 1961 to 1971, Lozano epitomizes the artist as hybrid: Working in the soup of Conceptual, Minimal, Pop, and feminist practices that simmered at the time, she belongs everywhere and nowhere at

  • Eija-Liisa Ahtila

    Featured at Documenta 11, Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s video installation The House, 2002, made its New York debut alongside four architectural models of houses (all 2004). In their clean lines and elegant mix of materials—including wood, stainless steel, asphalt sheeting, and plaster—the rigorously spare constructions propose the idea of a house as a machine for living and point in the direction of the good life. Efficient, open, tactile, and featuring an optimum of distraction-free space, they give a bare-bones preview of intelligent domestic structures (like states of mind) that have yet to be realized,

  • Collier Schorr

    In this show, Collier Schorr turned up the volume on her perennial favorite subject—teenage boys—and drew us once again into privileged proximity with a company of high school pugilists whose inner circle she happens to have penetrated. Her fascination with young athletes is reflected in the proportions of her big, new color photographs (measuring up to four by three feet) and the heightened drama she pumps into her pictures. By means of pronounced chiaroscuro she transforms the ordinariness of an empty gym into a moody film noir set—its stark, stripped-down stage and after-hours atmosphere

  • Jack Pierson

    Jack Pierson’s latest exhibition comprised three installation spaces, each captioned with a new signage work. Mismatched gold letters (with a white neon T to start) spell out TO YOUTH (all works 2003), both homage and indicator of loss. This hung adjacent to A Vignette Contrived of Various Objects Depicting the Artist in His Fortieth Year, a tableau of an artful life that announces its affinity with window display. Within a sleek, freestanding metal frame, a selection of furnishings and curios—a David Hockney etching of young male lovers, a bust of Apollo (the original “Greek god”) garlanded

  • Refiguration/Self-hybridization n°4, 1998.

    Orlan

    Long the most daring artist in her use of the body as medium, Orlan is both inspiration and freak.

    Long the most daring artist in her use of the body as medium, Orlan is both inspiration and freak. In sync with today’s ever more technologically assisted bodies (with retooled personas to match), the Paris-based performer rules as the foremost cyborg in contemporary art. From late-’70s parodies of conventional feminine roles to body-altering plastic surgeries in the ’90s and beyond, Orlan’s importance has yet to be calculated. The CNP aims to find out, devoting its entire space and part of the Centre de Création Contemporaine de Tours to her first retrospective. Some

  • Jay DeFeo

    You won’t find Jay DeFeo, a San Francisco painter who became active in the early ’50s, included in many anthologies of feminist art—at least not yet. But her interest in painting as an extension of her body, as something both radiant and abject, as both manageable and not, situates her in a singular position within her milieu. She was included in Dorothy Miller’s influential “Sixteen Americans” of 1959 at the Museum of Modern Art, yet her relative obscurity is confirmed by the Whitney’s small, posthumous exhibition: Fifteen years after her death, this is her first New York museum show. DeFeo’s

  • Jessica Stockholder

    There’s a lot to be said for the tacky, abject allure of thick paint on fake fur or plush pile carpet. Paint out of bounds almost always looks like a mistake, even when you know it isn’t. Since she began gaining attention for her distressed constructions in the mid-’80s, Jessica Stockholder’s sluggish, amateurish, temperamental interventions with paint have displaced the familiarity that clings to the everyday objects in her three-dimensional compositions and emphasized abstract values instead. With her crude swathes and blobs, she has consistently sabotaged surfaces and forced outlandish

  • Charline von Heyl

    It’s been roughly ten years since Charline von Heyl started showing her abstract paintings—first in Germany in the early ’90s and by mid-decade in New York. Even though her oil and mixed-media works on canvas have developed considerably, they retain their tentativeness and, overall, their unevenness. Doubt, it would seem, is an ever-present condition in her art. Is this a virtue, or does it diminish the work? How is the credibility of the better work affected by those paintings that ask how much “ugly” they can take and still remain viable? This exhibition, von Heyl’s best to date, offers

  • Robert Whitman

    Flash back to the early ’60s, when Lower Manhattan was a brand-new breeding ground for experimental art’s myriad crossovers with performance, theater, dance, sound, film, and new technology and Robert Whitman was all over the map of what would come to be known as “downtown art.” Fresh out of Rutgers, where he studied with Allan Kaprow alongside George Segal, Lucas Samaras, George Brecht, and Robert Watts, Whitman found his way to the forefronts of vanguard art with “theater works,” his preferred term for scripted and unscripted events staged with performers, audience participation, light and

  • Rineke Dijkstra

    In the photographs that make up her second New York solo gallery exhibition, Rineke Dijkstra keeps her eye trained on innocence as it gives way to experience. She brings us into proximity with two youthful subjects whom she has photographed periodically: Shany, a teenager newly drafted into the Israeli military (who would later desert); and Olivier, who signed up with the French foreign legion several years ago, as soon as he was old enough to do so.

    Dijkstra first shot Shany, as she did many other young women, at the induction center in Tel Hashomer, Israel—not the sort of location, the photographer

  • Lygia Clark, Óculos (Goggles), 1968. Demonstration view.

    FEMINISM & ART: NINE VIEWS

    HOW MIGHT WE ASSESS FEMINISM’S INITIAL IMPACTS ON ART, ITS SUBSEQUENT HISTORICIZATION, AND ITS CONTINUING INFLUENCE? ARTFORUM ASKED LINDA NOCHLIN, ANDREA FRASER, AMELIA JONES, DAN CAMERON, COLLIER SCHORR, JAN AVGIKOS, CATHERINE DE ZEGHER, ADRIAN PIPER, AND PEGGY PHELAN TO CONSIDER THIS QUESTION IN AN ONLINE ROUNDTABLE ASSEMBLED IN AUGUST. THEIR RESPONSES—REFINED BY THE PARTICIPANTS AND PRESENTED IN THE FOLLOWING PAGES—SUGGEST THAT FEMINISM AND FEMINIST DISCOURSES AS THEY HAVE FOUND EXPRESSION IN CONTEMPORARY ART ARE AMBIVALENT (“IN THE FULLEST SENSE OF THAT TERM,” AS PHELAN PUTS IT), MULTIFACETED, AND EVER EVOLVING.

    LINDA NOCHLIN

    As a participant in the women’s art movement of the late ’60s and early ’70s, I have decidedly mixed feelings about the historicization of feminism. It is difficult to see lived experience transformed into historical text. Things that seemed open and dynamic are now pinned down and displayed like butterflies in a case. Of course, there is also the tendency to idealize the past, to see the women’s art movement as totally united. This was not the case: Although all of us were for justice, equity, and a fair shake for women artists, critics, and academics, our views were extremely

  • Dennis Balk

    No two Dennis Balk exhibitions are ever alike. Over the course of two decades of work in New York, he has diagrammed quasi-historical vignettes on sets of cloth dinner napkins; written plays for the theater, some of which were linked to sculptural props displaced to a gallery; displayed raw vegetables on folding tables; and constructed machines that measure unseen forces (which were contingent on the viewer’s physical participation). He has written a novella concerning, among other things, secret knowledge in ancient Egypt, and he currently writes on topics of interest in nanotechnology and