Jeannine Tang

  • Still from Martin Beck’s The Environmental Witch-Hunt, 2008, HD digital video, color, sound, 10 minutes 2 seconds.

    CLOSE-UP: UNSUSTAINABLE DESIGN

    “‘NOTHING BETTER than a touch of ecology and catastrophe to unite, to unite the social classes—except perhaps a witch-hunt.’ I think that’s exactly where we start. Why don’t you take that line . . .” a woman suggests to her companion. He then begins reading to her from an essay that, we learn, was written by theorist Jean Baudrillard for distribution at the 1970 International Design Conference in Aspen, Colorado (IDCA). Speaking on behalf of a French delegation, Baudrillard attacked the theme of the conference, “Environment by Design,” eviscerating the environmental movement for its complicity

  • View of “Materializing ‘Six Years’: Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art,” 2012. Top: Alice Adams, Big Aluminum, 1965.

    “Materializing ‘Six Years’: Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art”

    AS ARTISTS OVER THE PAST DECADE have revisited earlier works of art—whether to interpret them anew, test their methods of production, or engage their liveness and mediation—curators have likewise revived landmark exhibitions to reassess their effects on the expansion of artistic and curatorial form. “Materializing ‘Six Years’: Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art,” curated by Catherine Morris and Vincent Bonin at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, examines the birth of Conceptualism using Lippard’s Six Years: The Dematerialization of the

  • Minouk Lim, The Weight of Hands, 2010, still from a color video, 13 minutes 50 seconds.

    “Minouk Lim: Heat of Shadows”

    This first US museum survey of work by Minouk Lim will offer signal examples of the acclaimed Korean artist’s video, sculpture, and performance work from the past seven years.

    This first US museum survey of work by Minouk Lim will offer signal examples of the acclaimed Korean artist’s video, sculpture, and performance work from the past seven years. Practicing what she calls “performance documentary theater,” Lim stages actions at specific sites, contesting globalist fantasies of unmoored place and repurposing the control technologies of urban modernity. The multichannel S.O.S.—Adoptive Dissensus, 2009, filmed from a Han River tourist boat, shuttles between footage of bankside spectacles and an audio broadcast on inequitable economic development;