Jeff Gibson

  • Tracey Moffatt, Fourth #2, 2000.

    Tracey Moffatt

    On her next return run, globe-trotting Tracey Moffatt will overshoot her Australian homeland, touching down in neighboring New Zealand for a fifteen-year survey of film, video, and photo-based work.

    On her next return run, globe-trotting Tracey Moffatt will overshoot her Australian homeland, touching down in neighboring New Zealand for a fifteen-year survey of film, video, and photo-based work. Curated in-house by Paula Savage and Lara Strongman, the show includes excerpts from the recent photo series “Fourth,” featuring TV-swipes of the Sydney 2000 Olympics. Riffing on myths of national and personal identity, Moffatt’s ironic revisionism dissects the compensatory romance of sports heroism, the Australian outback, and other founding fantasies. Often

  • William Kentridge

    William Kentridge gets the full treatment with a touring survey show (organized by Dan Cameron, Staci Boris, and Neal Benezra), featuring eleven animated films created since the late ’80s. Bristling with reference to the social circumstance of his South African homeland, Kentridge sketches up his satirical narratives by compulsively redrafting his drawings, more than sixty of which will accompany the exhibition. At the Hirshhorn, each film will be given its own viewing space—a must for cutting an interpretive swath through the prickly thicket of Kentridge’s content-laden parables. Feb.

  • 12th Biennale of Sydney

    As a fitting prelude to the Sydney 2000 Olympics, this Biennale's board has conscripted a curatorial A-team—Fumio Nano, Louise Neri, Hetti Perkins, Sir Nicholas Serota, Robert Storr, Harald Szeemann, and Nick Waterlow—to assemble an artistic pantheon of millenial proportions. With just a handful of exceptions, all fifty (mostly living) participants are certified hall-of-famers, who, to quote the press release, “have made a major impact on the thinking and values of our time.” Gerhard Richter, Matthew Barney, Louise Bourgeois, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, Yayoi Kusama, and the like will

  • Third Asia-Pacific Triennial

    Brisbane’s two-million-odd inhabitants just love a good expo, and with the Third Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, that’s pretty much what they’ve got. Unabashedly populist, the APT3 is for the most part a spectacular pedagogical construct, promoting a therapeutic image of protest (the persecution of East Timorese civilians by Indonesian forces swamped the media throughout the opening events), interracial harmony, and mutually beneficial hybridity. It is unquestionably a palliative that is utopian in aspiration—but with good reason. Having finally crawled out from under the thumb of

  • Third Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art

    With a curatorium more multiracial than the Jedi Council, the Third Asia-Pacific Triennial brings together work from as far afield as China, Pakistan, and Papua New Guinea. As the stats attest—75 artists and 150 curators, writers, and scholars from 20 countries—the APT is the most comprehensive survey of its kind. In keeping with the “past” and “present” themes of the first two triennials, the third installment, rather ambitiously subtitled “Beyond the Future,” is designed to spark consideration of the artistic and political destinies of the region—all from the vantage point of subtropical