Jeffrey Saletnik

  • Glenn Kaino

    The literalness of Glenn Kaino’s recent work is surprising. His midcareer retrospective “A Shout Within a Storm,” on view through April 22, includes the work The Winds of Revolt (Selma) 2, 2016, in which Kaino has rendered in charcoal on a waxed paper ground an iconic 1965 photograph of Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King, and other civil rights leaders marching arm in arm. Heat applied to the upper part of the composition has caused wax to drip down, partially distorting the image. In The Past Has Not Yet Happened (Panama), 2017, Kaino used a tactile alcohol transfer process to degrade

  • Julian Rosefeldt

    In his sumptuous forty-one-minute, five-channel video installation American Night, 2009, Julian Rosefeldt mines tropes of the western movie genre: the waiting woman, the gunslinger, the lonesome wanderer. One screen features a shawled woman in front of a log cabin looking out across the landscape, another a man on horseback riding through wilderness, and a third an archetypal Wild West street. Characters with dialogue are shown on the fourth and fifth screens, which depict an evening campfire and a saloon brawl. These sweeping scenes are occasionally punctuated by anachronous imagery and dialogue

  • “Paul Klee: L’ironie à l’œuvre”

    Paul Klee’s complex oeuvre, in all its disparate media, inspires continual reassessment. Using Friedrich Schlegel’s notion of romantic irony as an organizational device, Lampe traverses Klee’s career—from his rarely considered early reversed glass paintings to his iconic Angelus Novus, which will be displayed on this occasion for the first time in France, to his later work made in the shadow of Nazi Germany. At each step, Klee’s aesthetic whimsy is shown to be entwined with a self-consciously quixotic effort to reveal the transcendental realm beyond the visible world.

  • Rob Pruitt

    Painting one portrait of Barack Obama for each day of his tenure as president of the United States—for a total of 2,922 pictures by the time Obama leaves office—Rob Pruitt is making a “monument . . . about the entire presidency.” Each day, Pruitt browses online news sites in search of images of the president, and then, when he has settled on one picture, loosely brushes its contours with white paint onto a ready-made two-foot-square canvas primed with bands of red and blue pigment. The Museum of Contemporary Art hung as many of the paintings as its gallery walls could reasonably

  • Michael Sailstorfer

    Michael Sailstorfer is not the first artist to upend a tree; no doubt, he won’t be the last. Georg Baselitz inverted pictorial tradition in his iconic Der Wald auf dem Kopf (The Forest on Its Head), 1969; Rodney Graham’s photographic series “Oxfordshire Oaks,” 1990, depicts singular oaks in reverse, as they are actually received by the eye (and analog camera); Natalie Jeremijenko’s live, upturned trees, suspended in the air, perversely twist into seemingly unnatural forms in a vain attempt to right themselves in Tree Logic, 1999. Together, these constitute an offbeat iconography amid which one

  • Michelle Grabner

    During the past sixteen years, Michelle Grabner and Brad Killam have presided over some two hundred ad hoc exhibitions in an eight-by-eight-foot converted shed behind their house in Oak Park, Illinois, known as the Suburban. A full-scale replica of this concrete-block structure anchored “I Work From Home,” Grabner’s midcareer retrospective: She selected four artists—Michael Smith, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Amanda Ross-Ho, and Karl Haendel—to display work therein, effectively creating a rotation of shows within the show. Grabner would appear to be among the most generous artists of her

  • “Bauhaus: Art as Life”

    The exuberance of daily life at the Bauhaus is part of why the school continues to hold sway over our imagination.

    The exuberance of daily life at the Bauhaus is part of why the school continues to hold sway over our imagination. Performance, lavish costume balls, and sundry forms of experimentation and play were all essential activities. Too often, these seemingly contemporary practices are considered ancillary to the school’s history. But this exhibition, on the heels of major retrospectives at both Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, ventures another pass at the storied design school, this time with an eye for the social. Hundreds

  • “Gerrit Rietveld: The Revolution of Space”

    No design emblematizes De Stijl as powerfully as Gerrit Rietveld’s canonical Red Blue chair (1918/1923), with its demonstration of what Theo van Doesburg admiringly described as a tension between structural necessity and the “firm visualization of open spaces.”

    No design emblematizes De Stijl as powerfully as Gerrit Rietveld’s canonical Red Blue chair (1918/1923), with its demonstration of what Theo van Doesburg admiringly described as a tension between structural necessity and the “firm visualization of open spaces.” But Rietveld’s oeuvre cannot be reduced to De Stijl contributions alone. In an effort to more broadly situate the Dutch architect and designer, Vitra has gathered more than four hundred objects, drawings, and photographs—including the ever au courant Zig-Zag chair (ca. 1934),

  • Josef Albers: Colored Works on Paper

    To see the work of Josef Albers is to regard the transmutation of color into form; appreciating the way in which it has been achieved is another matter.

    To see the work of Josef Albers is to regard the transmutation of color into form; appreciating the way in which it has been achieved is another matter. This exhibition is a rare event, laying bare Albers’s meticulous—and precarious— efforts toward rendering the visual instability essential to his practice, through the presentation of some seventy studies made between the early ’40s and the late ’60s, supplemented by a catalogue with essays by Liesbrock, Semff, and Morgan Library & Museum curator Isabelle Dervaux. As have recent smaller-scale pairings