Jennifer Allen

  • news September 24, 2001

    ENWEZOR SEES “MAJOR PARADIGM SHIFT”

    ENWEZOR SEES “MAJOR PARADIGM SHIFT”

    A press conference held last week in Berlin for “Platform 1: Democracy Unrealized,” a series of lectures that will take place from October 9-30 as part of Documenta11, offered some indications of what might be the fallout of the terrorist attacks in the US in the world of international art. Artistic director Okwui Enwezor spoke of “a major shift in paradigm.” “We can only describe the events in the United States as changing our perception of reality,” said Enwezor. “What happened in New York and Washington has given us the possibility to think more critically about the questions that underlie

  • picks September 21, 2001

    Monica Bonvicini

    • Bonvicini's New Security Zone

    “A play of/with power and control.” Bonvicini uses these words to describe her latest project, Stone Wall, 2001, a fence made up of linked steel poles, glass panels, and fat metal chains. The sculpture, which is attached to the gallery walls, effectively cordons off the exhibition area, transforming the white cube of the gallery space into a forbidden security zone. By creating a protective barrier around an empty space, Bonvicini evidently wants us to take a long, hard look at the aesthetics of security measures commonly used to control public space. Although the barrier shows signs of an

  • news September 10, 2001

    EUROPEAN HEADLINES AT A GLANCE

    EUROPEAN HEADLINES AT A GLANCE

    BERLIN'S JEWISH MUSEUM OPENS: THE Jüdisches Museum Berlin finally opens its doors this week with the exhibition “Zwei Jahrtausende Deutsch-Jüdische Geschichte,” (Two thousand years of German-Jewish history). Curator Ken Gorbey has assembled over 3,900 objects, among them a decree from the Vatican's collection that refers to Jewish settlers in Cologne in the time of the Roman Empire. To mark the institution’s inauguration, Die Zeit has published a front-page commentary by editor Michael Naumann, formerly Chancellor Gerhard Schröder's adviser on cultural affairs and a key figure in the 1999 debates

  • news September 05, 2001

    ANTHONY D'OFFAY TO CLOSE GALLERY

    ANTHONY D'OFFAY TO CLOSE GALLERY

    Anthony D'Offay is closing shop. The top London gallerist, who turns sixty-two in January, has just announced that he will retire at the end of this year after more than thirty years in the business. His highly regarded galleries on Dering Street—which have recently hosted shows by Ron Mueck, Anselm Kiefer, Agnes Martin, Francesco Clemente, Sigmar Polke, and Bill Viola—will be closing permanently at the end of the year.

    D’Offay has not elaborated on his reasons for the decision, according to a statement issued by the gallery today. “There is never a good time to announce one's retirement,” he

  • Udo Kittelmann

    The fact that Udo Kittelmann—who takes over as director of Frankfurt’s Museum für Modeme Kunst (MMK) in January—was schooled as an optician rather than an art historian has not escaped the exacting eye of the German press. Upon his appointment last February, newspaper reports invariably noted the unconventional background, but any lingering doubts about credentials were altogether dispelled this summer: As commissioner for the German pavilion at the Venice Biennale, Kittelmann’s prescience with regard to contemporary art enjoyed a very public demonstration when Gregor Schneider went on to win

  • Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset

    When Martin Klosterfelde decided to move his gallery to a new location, he asked the Berlin-based artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset to create a new work for the inaugural show. The duo responded by installing an exact replica of the old gallery within the new one. Visitors expecting a fresh look into the future were instead ushered into the immediate past. The facade, the glass doorway, the walls, the lights, and even the electrical plugs from the former space were all painstakingly reproduced to 90 percent scale. Apart from the lighting and electrical fixtures, this gallery-within-a-gallery

  • news August 29, 2001

    BEATRIX RUF ARRIVES IN ZURICH

    BEATRIX RUF ARRIVES IN ZURICH

    The fall art season has yet to begin, but Beatrix Ruf is already working at the Kunsthalle Zürich, where she officially replaces founding director and curator Bernhard “Mendes” Bürgi in September. Ruf, head of the Kunsthaus Glarus since 1998, was chosen last year to succeed Bürgi, whose nomination as director of the Kunstmuseum Basel caused a dispute between city officials and the museum hiring committee (see Steven Henry Madoff’s “Hire’s Grounds” and “Smooth Move” in Artforum, February and April 2001, respectively). By comparison, Ruf’s appointment to the Kunsthalle Zürich was a more subdued

  • news August 27, 2001

    ARLES PHOTO FEST CHANGES COURSE

    ARLES PHOTO FEST CHANGES COURSE

    Les Rencontres internationales de la photographie, the annual international photography festival in Arles, France, closed last week with little to celebrate: mixed critical reception, weak attendance, and fiscal problems. Yet the festival’s future appears to be secure since François Barré was recently named president by Hervé Schiavetti, the newly elected mayor of Arles. Schiavetti, who would have normally been responsible for the job, couldn’t have selected a better replacement.

    The sixty-two-year-old Barré has held top cultural positions in France over the past decade, from deputy for the arts

  • news August 23, 2001

    EUROPEAN HEADLINES AT A GLANCE

    EUROPEAN HEADLINES AT A GLANCE

    RIST EXPECTING, PRESENTS EXPECTING: Pipilotti Rist’s latest exhibition at the Centraal Museum in Utrecht has gained the attention of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Online (FAZ.NET), which has gathered an in-depth dossier on the Swiss artist, including an interview and an overview of the international video-art market. Although Rist is pregnant, it appears that the title of her new work Expecting, 2001, has more to do with the immaculate conception than her upcoming motherhood: It was made expressly for the museum’s medieval chapel. The dossier also reveals that Rist plans to leave Europe

  • news August 07, 2001

    TATE STRIKE UNLIKELY

    TATE STRIKE UNLIKELY

    Negotiations are continuing between the Tate and the three unions that represent the 800-plus employees working at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool, and Tate St. Ives. Although a proposal for a pay raise put forth last week was rejected by the majority of employees, recent reports in the British press about a possible strike at the galleries have been “premature,” according to Piers Townshend, a union secretary.

    The three unions for Tate employees, Public and Commercial Services (PCS), the Institution of Professionals, Managers and Specialists (IPMS), and the First Division Association

  • news July 30, 2001

    CONFLICTS DEVELOP AT VIENNA'S MUSEUMSQUARTIER

    CONFLICTS DEVELOP AT VIENNA'S MUSEUMSQUARTIER

    Just one month after opening, Vienna’s MuseumsQuartier (www.mqw.at) is already embroiled in controversy. Last week, the directors of several institutions in the new cultural complex—Architektur Zentrum Wien, basis wien, Depot Kunst und Diskussion, Kunsthalle Wien, Public Netbase t0, Tanzquartier Wien, Wiener Festwochen, and the ZOOM Kindermuseum—held a press conference to air their grievances against Wolfgang Waldner, head of the company responsible for developing and managing the MuseumsQuartier. Among their complaints: Lack of communication and poor management have created a "poisoned climate.”

  • picks July 27, 2001

    Ann Veronica Janssens

    Ann Veronica Janssens Plays with Light

    How does one create art to show in a museum designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe? Belgian artist Ann Veronica Janssens, for one, has decided to take a light approach—quite literally—to Mies's famous glass-box design for Berlin's Neue Nationalgalerie: her installations both produce and thematize light—among other things—by means of mirrors that visitors can carry throughout the empty space to create reflections on the ceiling or check out the building from a wide range of angles. But the definite highlight of the exhibition is provided by o.T., 2001: five stainless steel bicycles that spectators

  • picks July 27, 2001

    Ueli Etter

    Ueli Etter Reinvents Landscape Design

    Swiss artist Ueli Etter’s park offers many paths to follow, but none are what you’d encounter on your average stroll through the local urban green. Instead, they have names such as Desperado Drive, Mellow Road, and Big Gender Junction. In other words, this ongoing multimedia project features elaborate plans that will never be realized. The most recent installment presents a series of impressive color drawings that take urban planning to new heights with landscapes and buildings made for emotionally turbulent and sexually charged lives. At the Tunnel of Love, for example, a body riddled with

  • news July 23, 2001

    “LE PAVILLON” IN PARIS; “BED OF FILM” IN BERLIN

    “LE PAVILLON” IN PARIS; “BED OF FILM” IN BERLIN

    “LE PAVILLON” PARTICIPANTS ANNOUNCED: The Palais de Tokyo (www.palaisdetokyo.com), the recently founded art organization in Paris, has announced the first class of “Le Pavillon,” its program for young artists, critics, and curators. Artists Charlotte Beaurepaire, Kim Sop Boninsegni, Gérald Decroux, Emily Joyce, Julia Rometti, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and independent curator Alexandre Pollazzon were selected from over 270 applicants. All between twenty-five and thirty years old, they will be expected to create their own projects while participating in the broader activities of the Palais

  • news July 19, 2001

    BEECROFT, A BLACKOUT, A CERAMICS BIENNIAL, AND THE G8 SUMMIT

    BEECROFT, A BLACKOUT, A CERAMICS BIENNIAL, AND THE G-8 SUMMIT

    On July 3, Vanessa Beecroft staged a performance with thirty women of color in the ducal palace in Genoa, Italy, where leaders of the world’s most industrialized nations and Russia will meet this weekend for the G-8 Summit. Though a press release had promised a “self-portrait,” the artist, who was born in Genoa, said the description was “an ironic comment.” “A local newspaper carried the headline ‘Vanessa returns home,’" said Beecroft in an interview. She insists, however, that this is an overstatement: “I don’t have this sense of belonging to any specific city. In response, I decided to be

  • news July 16, 2001

    CATHERINE DAVID TO HEAD WITTE DE WITH

    CATHERINE DAVID TO HEAD WITTE DE WITH

    After much speculation, the board of the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam (www.wdw.nl) has announced the appointment of Catherine David as the new director of the eleven-year-old institution. David, who takes over for Bartomeu Marí, intends to sign a three-year contract that begins on January 1, 2002.

    Prior to the appointment, David held posts as curator for contemporary art at the Centre Georges Pompidou (www.cnac-gp.org) and the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume (www.paris.org/Musees/JeudePaume/info.html) in Paris before accepting the directorship of Documenta X in 1997.

  • news July 11, 2001

    EUROPEAN NEWS: ELMGREEN & DRAGSET; HAACKE; HOET

    EUROPEAN NEWS: ELMGREEN & DRAGSET; HAACKE; HOET

    WORK BY ELMGREEN & DRAGSET BANNED: As Witte de With’s exhibition “Hortus Conclusus” (Enclosed garden) came to a close in Rotterdam last week, one artwork remained conspicuously absent: Cruising Pavilion/Powerless Structures, Fig. 55, 1998, by the Scandinavian artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset. The white wooden pavilion, which features glory holes inside, was banned by park officials from the city’s rose garden, where the artists intended to install the work. Curator Tanja Elstgeest succeeded in obtaining permission from both city officials and local police. But despite ongoing efforts,

  • news July 10, 2001

    NEW INTERNET DOMAIN LAUNCHED FOR MUSEUMS

    NEW INTERNET DOMAIN LAUNCHED FOR MUSEUMS

    A recent meeting of the International Council of Museums (ICOM, www.icom.org) held in Barcelona may eventually define the future of museums on the Internet. On June 30, the organization launched .museum, a new top-level domain (TLD) that promises to provide museums around the world with a distinct and unified online identity. In the near future, .museum may well replace the familiar domain suffix .org, currently used by most museums, or .com, as the museum domain of choice.

    The new domain has been proposed by MuseDoma (www.musedoma.org), a nonprofit organization created by ICOM in cooperation

  • news July 09, 2001

    BERLIN MONUMENT THREATENED

    BERLIN MONUMENT THREATENED

    Plans to build an underground garage at a site where the Nazis once staged a book burning have caused a stir in Berlin. Critics claim that the proposed garage will undermine Bibliothek, Micha Ullman’s solemn monument to the macabre event. In 1994-95, the Israeli artist built an underground library in the middle of the square where on May 10, 1933, entire libraries were tossed into a bonfire by the Nazis to exterminate “the Jewish spirit and liberalism.” Ullman’s monument, which is covered by glass, consists of an enclosed fifty-square-meter white room with empty shelves capable of holding over

  • news July 03, 2001

    GERMANY ESTABLISHES FEDERAL CULTURE FOUNDATION

    GERMANY ESTABLISHES FEDERAL CULTURE FOUNDATION

    Julian Nida-Rümelin, Chancellor Gerhard Schröder’s adviser for culture and media, has finally succeeded in establishing a national-level cultural foundation for Germany. Despite a tight budget, Finance Minister Hans Eichel recently approved DM25 million for the fiscal year 2002, a start-up amount that Nida-Rümelin hopes will eventually increase to DM75 million annually. The project, which dates back to the 1970s, has faced resistance from federal states that fear a loss of power and from those who mistrust any centralization of culture in the wake of Fascism. But the lack of a national culture