Jennifer Allen

  • picks July 02, 2001

    Bettina Allamoda

    Bettina Allamoda Puts Prêt-à-Porter on the Rack

    Bettina Allamoda has added yet another artifact to her “archaeology of the present,” an ongoing investigation of the sociopolitical implications of contemporary culture. For this exhibition, the Berlin-based artist filmed Parisian fashion shows and projected the footage onto a large-scale white model of the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. The building is one of many “international” sites in the city where catwalks are regularly set up by the fashion industry for its biannual shows. Allamoda’s complex installation demonstrates how the worldly atmosphere of political institutions, museums, and

  • news June 28, 2001

    MARC QUINN TAKES ROYAL ACADEMY PRIZE

    MARC QUINN TAKES ROYAL ACADEMY PRIZE

    Marc Quinn has won the Royal Academy of Arts Charles Wollaston Award 2001 for his white marble sculpture of a nude woman. The £25,000 prize, one of the largest in the UK, is awarded annually to the “most distinguished” work in the Royal Academy’s 1,000-work-plus Summer Exhibition. Quinn beat out finalists Frederick Gore and Richard Serra to take the prize.

    Quinn’s work, entitled Catherine Long, 2001, appears to be a modern version of a classical Greek sculpture; the graceful female figure is even missing an arm. But the sculpture, which was completed by Italian stonemasons, is closer to reality

  • news June 27, 2001

    NEW CULTURE MINISTERS APPOINTED IN BRITAIN AND ITALY

    NEW CULTURE MINISTERS APPOINTED IN BRITAIN AND ITALY

    NEW HEAD OF BRITISH CULTURE: Tessa Jowell has been appointed Britain’s new culture secretary in Tony Blair’s post-election cabinet reshuffle. She will be assisted by Baroness Tessa Blackstone, the minister directly responsible for museums, galleries, and architecture, and whose special interests include opera, ballet, and education. Jowell, who has worked in public health and social welfare in the past, appears to view culture primarily as a quality of life and financial issue. "This is about leisure, it is about free time…. The creative industries are part of the generation of our national

  • news June 26, 2001

    WANTED IN BERLIN: STOLEN FREUD PORTRAIT OF BACON

    WANTED IN BERLIN: STOLEN FREUD PORTRAIT OF BACON

    The British Council and the Tate Gallery have initiated a poster campaign to find a painting by Lucian Freud that was stolen in May 1988 from the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin. Over 2,000 “Wanted” posters featuring Freud’s small-scale 1952 portrait of Francis Bacon are being plastered across the city. A telephone hotline has also been established for information about the missing portrait. Whoever finds the painting will be awarded DM300,000 with no questions asked. Freud, who was born in Berlin and emigrated to London in 1931, hopes to recover the painting for a retrospective of his work that

  • news June 22, 2001

    LARS NITTVE HEADS TO STOCKHOLM

    LARS NITTVE HEADS TO STOCKHOLM

    Director of the Tate Modern Lars Nittve will be leaving his position to run the Moderna Museet (www.modernamuseet.se) in Stockholm. The appointment comes in the wake of David Elliott’s announcement last month that he had accepted an offer to head the new Mori Art Museum (www.moriart.org) in Tokyo. Nittve will take up his new position in November, 2001.

    Appointed in 1998, Nittve oversaw the Tate Modern’s (www.tate.org.uk) successful opening last year, since which it has become the most popular museum in the world, with over 5.2 million visitors. “It has been an extraordinary privilege to be the

  • news June 14, 2001

    BERLIN'S FINANCIAL CRISIS SQUEEZES CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

    BERLIN'S FINANCIAL CRISIS SQUEEZES CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

    With accumulated debts of over DM65 billion, Berlin is facing its worst financial crisis ever. The city recently announced that it must find an extra DM7 billion in order to save the failing Berlin Bankgesellschaft, a bank corporation in which it is the largest shareholder. The worsening crisis threatens several cultural institutions and projects, most notably the DM2 billion restoration of Museum Island, a group of five historical museums designated as a world cultural heritage site by UNESCO. Berlin’s culture minister, Christoph Stölzl, hopes that the federal government will take on the city’s

  • news June 13, 2001

    LISTE 01 UNDER WAY IN BASEL

    LISTE 01 UNDER WAY IN BASEL

    LISTE—The Young Art Fair (www.liste.ch) got under way yesterday, June 12, in Basel. Now in its sixth year, the fair boasts over forty galleries from fifteen countries presenting works, including Bojan Sarcevic’s prototype for a house with no windows, Govinda Mens’s “breathing wall,” videos by Anna Niesterowicz, and sculptures by Andrew Kerr, the youngest artist at the fair. Nine of the seventeen artists featured in this year’s ”Art Statements” at Art Basel have already participated at the younger fair.

    LISTE is welcoming several galleries for the first time: Masataka Hayakawa (Tokyo), Hamish

  • news June 12, 2001

    VIENNA'S NEW KUNSTHALLE COMPLETED

    VIENNA'S NEW KUNSTHALLE COMPLETED

    The Kunsthalle Wien (www.kunsthallewien.at) celebrated the completion of its new building today with the opening of the group exhibition “Eine barocke Party: Augenblicke des Welttheaters in der zeitgenössische Kunst" (A baroque party: moments of theatrum mundi in contemporary art). The show is the last in a series of inaugural events that began in February with a performance by Vanessa Beecroft and continued in May with a solo show of works by Steve McQueen. Curated by Sabine Folie and Michael Glasmeier, the exhibition features works by Dinos and Jake Chapman, Wim Delvoye, Ulrike Grossarth,

  • news June 11, 2001

    ART BASEL READY TO ROLL

    ART BASEL READY TO ROLL

    Organizers are preparing to welcome artists, gallerists, and collectors from around the world to Art 32 Basel (www.art.ch), which runs June 13 through June 18, right on the heels of the opening of the Venice Biennale. Of the fair’s many sectors, Art Unlimited, a platform created last year for “outsized” art projects, promises to be one of this year’s highlights. From 192 submissions, sixty-seven projects were selected, including works by Ilya Kabakov, Richard Serra, and James Turrell as well as younger artists such as Pipilotti Rist, Atelier van Lieshout, and Vanessa Beecroft. A videothèque

  • news June 07, 2001

    AARON BETSKY TO DIRECT NETHERLANDS ARCHITECTURE INSTITUTE

    AARON BETSKY TO DIRECT NETHERLANDS ARCHITECTURE INSTITUTE

    On June 1, Aaron Betsky began his tenure as the new director of the Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAI) in Rotterdam (www.nai.nl). Formerly a curator of Architecture, Design and Digital Projects at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Betsky will be taking over for Kristin Feireiss, who will become the director of the International Architecture Biennial, which is set to begin in Rotterdam in summer 2002.

    The Netherlands Architecture Institute is the largest architecture center in Europe, with a staff of 100 that oversees exhibition spaces, a public library, and a study center for researchers.

  • news June 04, 2001

    EUROPEAN NEWS ROUNDUP

    EUROPEAN NEWS ROUNDUP

    YBA JOINS ROYAL ACADEMY: Gary Hume was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Arts through a secret vote held recently in London. According to a report in The Observer, the thirty-nine-year-old artist previously claimed that he would never join the conservative organization but is now “delighted and honoured” to join its ranks. Oddly, it seems that not only the artist but also the academy has changed its tune. In 1997, Hume took part in the “Sensation” exhibition at the Royal Academy that led four of its eighty members to resign. This summer, Hume—along with fellow “Sensation” alumni Damien

  • picks June 03, 2001

    Chiharu Shiota

    Chiharu Shiota Gets Dirty with Dirt

    Chiharu Shiota likes to get dirty with dirt. The twenty-nine-year-old artist came to Berlin four years ago and has since made a name for herself with videos and installations that use earth in a ritual fashion. Her second solo show in Berlin features a group of ten-foot-tall dresses that have been thoroughly soiled with earth and then hung under working shower heads, like the strange remains of an Ophelia cult. Also on view are Shiota’s mesmerizing mud-bath video and an array of her complex yarn works that capture dresses and body parts inside spiderweb forms.

  • news May 24, 2001

    PALAIS DE TOKYO LAUNCHES PROGRAM FOR EMERGING ARTISTS

    PALAIS DE TOKYO LAUNCHES PROGRAM FOR EMERGING ARTISTS

    The Palais de Tokyo in Paris (www.palaisdetokyo.com) has announced the creation of Le Pavillon, a study program for young artists that will begin in November 2001, shortly before the new center for contemporary art opens its doors to the public. The program is intended to give artists at the beginning of their careers the opportunity to produce their own works and to participate in the daily activities of the Palais de Tokyo. Only seven candidates will be selected, along with one or two curators or critics to realize individual and collective works. The deadline for applications is June 8.

    The

  • news May 16, 2001

    BRITAIN'S FREE ADMISSION POLICY GAINS MOMENTUM

    BRITAIN'S FREE ADMISSION POLICY GAINS MOMENTUM

    Mark Jones, the new director of the Victoria and Albert Museum (www.vam.ac.uk) in London, has started his tenure this month by announcing the abolition of entrance fees for all visitors by November 2001. The new policy is set to go into effect just in time for the opening of the museum's new British Galleries, which tell the story of British design from 1500–1900, and leaves only the Natural History Museum and the Imperial War Museum as top London museums still charging a fee at the door since culture secretary Chris Smith initiated a “free admission policy” in 1998 aimed at making public

  • news May 07, 2001

    DAVID ELLIOTT TO LEAVE MODERNA MUSEET FOR MORI ART MUSEUM

    DAVID ELLIOTT TO LEAVE MODERNA MUSEET FOR MORI ART MUSEUM

    After five years at the head of the Moderna Museet (www.modernamuseet.se) in Stockholm, David Elliott has announced that he will leave his current position this November to become the first director of the new Mori Art Museum in Tokyo, which is scheduled to open in 2003. Elliott presided over the opening of the Moderna Museet's new building in 1998 and organized, among other exhibitions, “After the Wall: Art and Culture in Post-Communist Europe” in 1999. “I am sorry to leave,” explains Elliott, a British citizen who is the first non-Japanese museum director to be appointed in that country. “I

  • news May 04, 2001

    WHITEREAD POURS A PLINTH FOR TRAFALGAR SQUARE

    WHITEREAD POURS A PLINTH FOR TRAFALGAR SQUARE

    After eighteen months of planning and preparation, Rachel Whiteread’s hollow replica of a massive plinth in Trafalgar Square was poured today in London. The sculpture, entitled Monument, is one of Whiteread’s most ambitious public art works, along with House in London and Watertower in New York, as well as the recent Holocaust memorial unveiled last November in Vienna.

    The original plinth, which served as a model for the cast, is one of four in the square, but it has been empty since its completion in the mid-nineteenth century (the other three plinths support sculptures of historical figures).

  • Monica Bonvicini

    Architecture may be the oldest art form, but for Monica Bonvicini a history of oppression lurks behind every facade. Her structures and interventions expose everyday materials as sites of ideological struggle—bearers of difference based on class, sexual preference, and, above all, gender. Bonvicini’s debut show in France will offer an overview of her eclectic oeuvre, including videos, (de)constructions, and drawings, as well as a look at her most recent installation, Turning Walls, 2001, an array of Home Depot fences the artist describes as “a punk version of a postmodern suburban facade, or

  • “The State of Things (Part I)”

    Start cramming. Catherine David is back with “L’État des choses (1ère partie),” her first major exhibition since curating Documenta X four years ago. Taking her cue from the philosopher Jacques Rancière, who links politics and aesthetics through sense perception, David proposes an anthropological development of the aesthetic, whereby art becomes indistinguishable from politics and media. The thirteen artists included in the show, mostly filmmakers and photographers, work in highly politicized and diverse cultural contexts in South Africa, China, Europe, and the Middle East. All use documentary

  • picks April 21, 2001

    Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset

    Elmgreen & Dragset's gallery within a gallery

    Déjà vu? Definitely. To inaugurate the new location of the Klosterfelde gallery on Zimmerstrasse, Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset built an exact replica of the old gallery at Linienstrasse 160. Doors, walls, lighting, and even electrical outlets have all been meticulously copied and installed, effectively transforming the large new space into “a gallery within a gallery,” one that’s capable of exhibiting its own history. The gesture is far from waxing nostalgic; rather, the Berlin-based duo once again question the neutrality of the white cube by putting its empty walls on display.

  • news April 20, 2001

    BERLIN BIENNALE GETS UNDER WAY

    BERLIN BIENNALE GETS UNDER WAY

    The second Berlin Biennale (www.berlinbiennale.de) finally opens today, featuring works by over fifty artists from thirty-two countries—all selected by Saskia Bos, director of De Appel Foundation in Amsterdam. Originally slated to begin last fall during the Berlin art fair, the biennial was delayed by a complex budget approval process as well as difficulties in securing locations. Works will be exhibited at the Postfuhramt and the Kunst-Werke—both venues for the first biennial in the central gallery area known as “Berlin-Mitte”—as well as further east in the city at the S-Bahn station Jannowitzbrücke