Jessica Simmons

  • picks March 10, 2020

    Kathleen Ryan

    Kathleen Ryan’s exhibition is a study of grossly overripe fruit: Fleshy chunks of festering “watermelon” are dispersed across two rooms while a twisted stem of deflated “grapes” regally occupies a third. Glimmering and putrescent, these enlarged, human-size sculptures of spoiled fruit are adorned with a seemingly infinite number of multicolored glass beads and semiprecious stones whose placement convincingly replicates the otherworldly abstractions of creeping mold spores. As contemporary bedfellows to sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Dutch vanitas of rotting food, they entangle excess with

  • picks December 06, 2019

    Kara Joslyn

    The grayscale paintings in Kara Joslyn’s “Tragic Kingdom” portend surreal, vaporous worlds that might have been plucked from the depths of Platonic allegory or Jungian psychology. Spindly saplings, humanoid figures, colorless blossoms, foreboding interiors, and grinning moons suggesting disembodied masks parade through primordial voids. Visual dichotomies flood these compositions. Vague shadows stretch from illogical light sources and from fields of matte black paint. All is rendered in airbrush with nary an errant mark.

    Joslyn’s source materials include mid-century instructional booklets for

  • picks March 21, 2019

    Servane Mary

    Untitled (Mariel Hemingway dancing, burned piece), 2011, is the most visceral of Servane Mary’s sculpturally altered, found photographs of women: A folded scrap of silk, wrinkled and stained with the brindled abstractions of a solvent transfer, hangs like a papery flap of singed skin over a gauzy monotone print of the actress in her youth. By juxtaposing the photograph, a static signifier, and the material appendage, a weathered bodily object, this work functions as a pointed surrogate for the desirable youthful female while making tangible the corporeal decay that will eventually swallow her