Joanna Warsza

  • Kamikaze loggias, Tbilisi, Georgia, 2007. Photo: Levan Asabashvili/Urban Reactor.

    Joanna Warsza

    “GEORGIA IS LIKE ITALY GONE MARXIST.” Georgians have often used this bon mot to introduce their small post-Soviet state to foreigners, for whom the country is still largely a blind spot on the cultural and geopolitical map. Although Georgia is currently on a path to a market economy and the model of Western democracy, the analogy nevertheless makes sense, not only because of the climate, the viticulture, the patriarchal regime, and the dramatic landscape but also because of the community-oriented mind-set of the country’s vocal and self-determined inhabitants. And this paradoxical admixture has