JONATHAN LASKER

  • THEIR FAVORITE EXHIBITIONS OF THE YEAR

    To take stock of the past year, Artforum contacted an international group of artists to find out which exhibitions and events were, in their eyes, the very best of 2009.

    RICHARD ALDRICH

    “Pierre Bonnard: The Late Interiors” (Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) You kind of get the feeling that Bonnard was a real artist. He was concerned not with the past (art history), present (his contemporaries), or future (his legacy), but with expressing himself in terms of his own perceptions, interactions, and experiences of the world. Whether of a room, a still life, or a loved one, each painting becomes

  • THICK AND THIN: A ROUNDTABLE

    As the 1970s gave way to the ’80s, the slogan “return to painting” was as often heard in the discussion around contemporary art as the counter-mantra, the “death of painting.” In the last issue of Artforum, a group comprising mostly critics and art historians opened our two-part examination of painting in the ’80s and beyond with a look back at the death-of-painting debate that raged at the beginning of the decade. For this month’s pendant discussion introduced by ROBERT STORR, we assembled a second panel, largely made up of painters and curators—and asked them to tell us where painting has

  • New Math

    FOR ME, THE WORK of Piet Mondrian is linked to the 20th-century discourse on objective reality. This discourse has, I feel, led to a dichotomy in Modern painting. On the one hand, there is the tendency, explicit in movements from Constructivism through Minimalism, to present the visual in purely objective terms. On the other hand, there is the response to this intense objectification, which can be felt in the massive sublimation of Surrealism. To me, this dichotomy shows the alienation of the mind from objective reality when it is unable to sufficiently sublimate that reality.

    Mondrian’s intent