JULIAN SCHNABEL

  • the best of 2016

    TO TAKE STOCK OF THE PAST YEAR, ARTFORUM ASKED AN INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF ARTISTS TO SELECT A SINGLE IMAGE, EXHIBITION, OR EVENT THAT MOST MEMORABLY CAPTURED THEIR EYE IN 2016.

    ALEX HUBBARD

    Rodin’s The Thinker, 1880–81, after a bomb planted by the Weather Underground exploded on March 24, 1970, at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Photo: C. D. Moore.

    ANNE COLLIER

    Portrait of Hilton Als by Catherine Opie, wrapped in bubble plastic, as it appeared in “James Baldwin/Jim Brown and the Children,” curated by Als for the Artist’s Institute, New York, June 14.

    SLAVS AND TATARS

    A disposable, self-administering

  • Ingrid Sischy

    THE BEST IS NOT ENOUGH. Ingrid Sischy left us on July 24, a Friday, at around 2:10 in the morning. Ingrid would modestly say she was just a witness, but she was much more: the conductor of a massive global orchestra comprising painters, sculptors, writers, actors, directors, photographers, fashion designers, musicians, curators, and politicians. Everyone trusted her. She was trustworthy. She was attracted to talent. She recognized it and nurtured it, discovering young artists and rescuing realized artists, all of whom were equally entranced by her ability to get them and make their world more

  • ARTISTS ON AB-EX:

    EI ARAKAWA

    Gutai is often considered the starting point for postwar art in Japan, typically described as a response to American Abstract Expressionism (via Pollock, who first exhibited in Japan in 1951) and as a parallel to French art informel (via Michel Tapié). However, I want to point out two earlier collectives of midcentury Japanese art (pre-Conceptual On Kawara aside): Jikken Kōbō (Experimental Workshop)—an avant-garde art, music, and theater collective that was influenced by the Bauhaus and European Surrealism—and Zero-kai (Zero Society), whose member Kazuo Shiraga had already

  • THE PATIENTS AND THE DOCTORS

    Agony has many faces. One need not talk of agony but it is the reason why I began to work. It is the reason why I continue to work. When I’m working I feel OK, but a need to make something isn’t a need to feel better. You have a feeling about something; you’re working when you’re looking for it.

    Active,

    passive,

    loud or quiet,

    agony (are the different tones from one painting to the next. We can say agony is the state, the subject matter; we can also say it is the pack of lies that forces someone to reconstruct reality).

    The mentality of the artist is the thing:

    it is a selfish person,

    a presumptuous