Julie Jones

  • picks May 20, 2013

    Jimmie Durham

    Jimmie Durham’s drawings, made during his residency at Atelier Calder in Saché, France, draw the viewer into a contemplative state while also inciting a profound sense of anxiety. Visible within the fourteen drawings (all works untitled, 2007) in this exhibition are ropes, fish, and explosions of graphite pigments. Sheets of white paper, sometimes showing traces of fingerprints around the edges, have been brutalized in places—almost to the point of tearing—through the artist’s process: Durham immerses pieces of rope and rubber fish in a bag filled with graphite powder and then throws

  • picks September 20, 2012

    Temps étrangers

    Is the artist a worker just like any other? Can artists’ laboring hours be measured? The thirteen curators from the Cartel de Kunst collective selected twelve contributors for this exhibition, and all expose the naïveté, absurdity, and complexity of such questions. Although the show’s subject matter is nothing new, it feels original here, thanks to the freshness of the work on view and the way the pieces activate a historical space: At the beginning of the twentieth century, Mains d’Œuvres was a recreation center for workers at the Valéo factory, and in 2001 it was converted into a venue for

  • picks May 08, 2012

    Raymond Gervais

    Placed on a lectern in the central room of Rosacape is a paper sheet that reads: TO WALK FROM THE GRAVE OF SAMUEL BECKETT (1906–1989), IN THE MONTPARNASSE CEMETRY, TO THE GRAVE OF CLAUDE DEBUSSY (1862–1918), IN THE PASSY CEMETRY. Singly present in Raymond Gervais’s previous work (see Elementa Musicae [Elementary Music], 1987, or Dans le Cylindre [In the Cylinder], 1994), the writer and the composer are here united through an imagined relationship, based on actual common bonds: Beckett occasionally played Debussy’s compositions, both lived and are buried in Paris, and both faced a deep artistic

  • picks March 17, 2012

    Mathieu Mercier

    Mathieu Mercier’s current exhibition, “Sublimations,” marks a noticeable break from the DIY spirit of his earlier projects and examines the shifting status of the object within artistic and commercial fields. An installation in one room of this show evokes an impersonal showroom display with Duchampian humor. Objects sourced from supermarkets (bananas, plates, a candle, and binoculars, to name a few) are individually placed on Corian pedestals. Each is paired with a pictogram or depiction of a measuring tool––perfectly printed on the support through a process known as sublimation. Some have been

  • picks March 06, 2012

    James Castle

    James Castle’s works were collected by a small circle of admirers during his lifetime, but in recent years he has attracted unprecedented attention from both museums and the art market. After retrospectives at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (2009) and Madrid’s Reina Sofía (2011), the Galerie Karsten Greve, in collaboration with the James Castle Collection and Archive, is currently presenting the artist’s first retrospective exhibition in France, with a selection of ninety-one works.

    Born deaf, Castle spent his entire life on an isolated family farm in Idaho. He never learned how to speak, use

  • picks January 09, 2012

    Markus Raetz

    This retrospective of Markus Raetz’s output celebrates the artist’s printed works, which, since the 1970s, have made use of eclectic themes and forms. The show’s curators, Farideh Cadot and Marie-Cécile Miessner, have successfully organized the diverse printing techniques used by the artist (photogravure, chiseling, etching, aquatint, wood engraving, and drypoint). Their selection of drawings, sketchbooks, and ten sculptures includes two hundred pieces, mostly from the Bibliothèque’s collections.

    The point of view of both the artist and the viewer is key to understanding the art in this exhibition.

  • picks December 26, 2011

    Jesper Just

    It is a risky move for an artist to build his or her work on a series of references. Yet the output of the Danish-born, New York–based artist Jesper Just, which consists of countless allusions to film history, is a veritable tour de force. For his first monographic exhibition in France, he presents six videos, including This Nameless Spectacle, 2011, which was commissioned in part by the Musée d'Art Contemporain du Val-de-Marne. With highly effective staging, this piece is a tribute to the panoramic shot: Two long screens face off, each showing different points of view of the same scene, an

  • picks November 10, 2011

    Nick van Woert

    “Anatomy,” Nick van Woert’s solo debut in Paris, offers a clever gambit that juxtaposes contemporary culture with the past. The Brooklyn-based artist uses building materials including concrete and stone, as well as highly structured objects made from industrial and organic materials, such as polyurethane, fiberglass, steel, and wood. The show, which is a tribute to Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, 1632, stimulates the imagination, prompting viewers to take a closer look as they stroll among these hybrid, anthropomorphic sculptures. Despite their seeming simplicity, these