Kate Nesin

  • Cy Twombly

    We may think we’re well-versed on Cy Twombly by now, but we’ve been surprised before; his work is easy to recognize yet, crucially, hard to know. This fall, the Pompidou promises a definitive retrospective—the first since Twombly’s death in 2011 and by far the largest ever—that will attend to his propensity for series. The emphasis will be on his radical, affective attenuation of history painting, with three extraordinary suites convening for the first time: Nine Discourses on Commodus, 1963; Fifty Days at Iliam, 1978; and Coronation of Sesostris, 2000.

  • SOURCE CODE: THE ART OF DIANE SIMPSON

    EVERY SCULPTURE by Diane Simpson proceeds from at least one source, though this is a deceptively simple statement: Her singular three-dimensional works tend to come from another dimension entirely, from flat printed matter, renderings of material culture discovered in used bookstores, university libraries, and online archives—pictures of medieval clothing, Art Deco patterns, or commercial packaging design. She then fixes on a formally salient aspect of the source, isolating, condensing, and sometimes contorting it in pencil on graph paper. Simpson thereby enacts a private translation—an

  • “David Reed: Heart of Glass”

    As an exhibition title, “Heart of Glass”—already a 1976 Herzog film and a 1979 Blondie single—summons an imagistic paradox specific to David Reed’s paintings.

    As an exhibition title, “Heart of Glass”—already a 1976 Herzog film and a 1979 Blondie single—summons an imagistic paradox specific to David Reed’s paintings. Since the 1980s, luminous ribbons of oil and alkyd paints have coiled across his canvases, marks at once muscular and cool, vigorous and suspended, painterly and photographic. Compelled equally by William Eggleston and Annibale Carracci’s Farnese ceiling, Reed is a committed painter with a multimedia sensibility. Catalogue essays by Stephan Berg, Christoph Schreier, and Richard Shiff accompany this