Kent Minturn

  • Jean Dubuffet

    The Morgan Library & Museum’s impressive and comprehensive “Dubuffet Drawings, 1935–1962” comes at the end of a recent wave of Dubuffet mania that spawned three other New York shows: at the Museum of Modern Art, the American Folk Art Museum, and Acquavella Galleries. While the Morgan’s exhibition putatively focuses on Dubuffet as draftsman, drawing here is broadly defined. The works on paper range in material from graphite pencil and watercolor to india ink imprints, wax crayon, gouache, butterfly-wing collages, incised scratchboards, and paint with gum arabic.

    Curated by Isabelle Dervaux, the

  • Klee and America

    “Klee and America” (organized by Josef Helfenstein, director of the Menil Collection) builds on the success of MoMA's 1987 retrospective and the collection-specific “Paul Klee at the Guggenheim Museum” in 1993, while shedding new light on the Swiss painter's legacy in the US.

    Walter Benjamin famously interpreted Klee's Angelus Novus, 1920, as a figure that turns toward the past while history pushes forward. Similarly, “Klee and America” (organized by Josef Helfenstein, director of the Menil Collection) builds on the success of MoMA's 1987 retrospective and the collection-specific “Paul Klee at the Guggenheim Museum” in 1993, while shedding new light on the Swiss painter's legacy in the US. Through more than sixty oil paintings, watercolors, and drawings, as well as documentary material on influential collectors like Alfred Barr and Galka