Kevin Pratt

  • Frank O. Gehry and David Childs, New York Times Headquarters, New York, NY. Project, 2000.

    Tall Buildings

    Often existing simply as a rearguard action against the inevitable banality of the merely immense, most office towers constructed over the last quarter century are little more than architectural one-liners.

    Often existing simply as a rearguard action against the inevitable banality of the merely immense, most office towers constructed over the last quarter century are little more than architectural one-liners. Curators Terence Riley of MoMa’s Department of Architecture and Design and Guy Nordenson, a prominent structural engineer, hope to demonstrate that the genre still has legs. This show features photographs, drawings, and models of twenty-five “tall buildings” from around the world and in various stages of completion, including built projects like Norman

  • green design

    IF HISTORICAL ANALOGIES offer any guidance, green design will emerge as the modernism of the new century. There is more than a passing similarity between recent eclecticism in architecture and the stylistic free-for-all that characterized the early twentieth century, which saw a succession of neohistorical and decorative styles come and go rather quickly. Neo-Gothic, neo-Tudor, Beaux-Arts classicism, Art Nouveau: All had their brief moment before modernism crystallized (at least in the minds of the architectural establishment) as an “appropriate” aesthetic. It is now fashionable to talk about

  • House in Bordeaux, France, 1998.

    Rem Koolhaas

    Rem Koolhaas and his doppelgänger offices OMA and AMO (practice and research, respectively) are the subject of a retrospective that began its run at Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin last November.

    Rem Koolhaas and his doppelgänger offices OMA and AMO (practice and research, respectively) are the subject of a retrospective that began its run at Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin last November. A large number of projects and innovations from 1996 to the present are now installed in one of Koolhaas’s earlier buildings, the Kunsthal Rotterdam. The exhibition, designed by Jens Hommert of OMA, is curated by Kayoko Ota, also of OMA, and Andres Lepik and Cristina Steingräber, both from the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. An

  • Zaha Hadid

    Architects who skirt the line between art and architecture generally insist on having things both ways: Artists (and art critics) are supposed to recognize them as architects and allow them certain liberties, while architects (and architectural critics) must do the same, on opposite grounds. The difference between a good architectural rendering and a bad watercolor often ends up a question of semantics. That said, Zaha Hadid is one contemporary architect whose graphic oeuvre deserves to be called an artistic achievement.

    Hadid’s graphic style is actually fairly straightforward, in the sense that

  • “Yard”

    Robert Smithson was one of the first artists to think about suburbia in geological terms. His insight that the structure of the suburban landscape is inherently crystalline—the result of mineral processes unfolding at the limits of human perception—remains a relevant counterpoint to the sociohistorical narrative that’s much more often used to understand the sprawl that surrounds our cities. Defining suburbia as a synthesis of the urban and the pastoral—as a kind of intermediary condition dependent on antecedent forms of manmade landscape—leads artists into familiar postmodern terrain, where they