Louisa Elderton

  • picks May 11, 2016

    “Bloody Life”

    Bloody life. A phrase we might utter, exasperated, navigating a world that can be both exciting and dispiriting. Curated by Herald St in collaboration with Gigiotto del Vecchio and Stefania Palumbo of the Berlin gallery Supportico Lopez and mounted throughout Herald St’s East and West End spaces, this group exhibition (whose title is borrowed from a body of work by Gilbert & George that is not presented here) brings together a wide range of artworks—some you’ll love, some not—but hey, that’s bloody life.

    Athena Papadopoulos’s bold fabric works are somewhat corporeal—she gives us bulbous legs in

  • picks April 22, 2016

    “UNEARTHED”

    Clay has often been synonymous with craft. From ancient Roman, Greek, and Etruscan pottery to Japanese Oribe ware and eighteenth-century European porcelain, ceramics have frequently been excluded from the realm of the fine art, its practitioners spoken of with such qualifiers as “ceramic artist” or “potter.” Cocurated by Dan Halm and LA-born artist Geo Gonzalez, this exhibition, “UNEARTHED,” brings together seventeen international emerging artists to reveal the expressive potential of the medium beyond its antiquated association with mere vessels. Politics of gender, sexuality, and commodification

  • picks March 28, 2016

    Deborah Remington

    Deborah Remington’s paintings present open doorways floating as luminous portals into the gray abyss or hang like opaque, reflection-less mirrors. Her works recall science fiction with nods toward the dreamlike moods of Surrealism and the industrial weight of the machine age. Bringing together a selection of the artist’s paintings and drawings from the 1970s and 1980s, this exhibition reveals her fascination with layering hovering forms to otherworldly effect.

    Having studied at the California School of Fine Arts in the 1950s under Clyfford Still, Remington followed a gestural, Abstract Expressionist

  • picks February 10, 2016

    Claudio Tozzi

    Building on Tate Modern’s recent “EY Exhibition: The World Goes Pop,” Brazilian artist Claudio Tozzi’s works from 1967–71 are surveyed at this gallery in collaboration with the Sao Paulo–based Almeida e Dale. Bright colors are framed by bold outlines in the artist’s stylized figurative paintings—a formal approach similar to those of many of his Pop contemporaries, such as Roy Lichtenstein or Allan D’Arcangelo, among countless others.

    Tozzi’s work covered a wide range of subjects, from the popular to the political—legendary footballer Pelé, a man’s lingering gaze upon a woman at a bar, a helmet-clad

  • picks December 07, 2015

    Dirk Braeckman

    There’s a dense, black space here where light is barely perceptible and matte surfaces intermittently reveal pattern and enigmatic form. Shrouded in a mood of mystery, this is the nature of each frame of Dirk Braeckman’s latest photographs. This exhibition brings together ten small gelatin silver prints with a larger ink-jet print on Japanese silk paper, the latter of which is scaled to almost fill an entire wall. Their subject matter references domestic interiors and landscapes, often approaching abstraction. Swamped in darkness, the corner of a room lies lonely; a curtain billows before an