Malik Gaines

  • Jason Moran

    What lies between the arts is jazz, or so Jason Moran proposes in his first solo museum exhibition. An acclaimed pianist, Moran makes music that is reverent of jazz, but his technical and disciplinary agility orient the piano out toward its broad potential. A piano is a big device, and playing it can feel like activating an installation. This feeling extends to his gleaming sculptural sets, which model legendary music stages. Three works from this series (two from 2015, plus a new piece based on the storied New York venue Slugs’ Saloon) are

  • SAME DIFFERENCE

    THERE IS SOMETHING very homosexual about using “multiple instruments of the same kind.” This is the ensemble instruction composer Julius Eastman gave for performing some of his most exciting scores, in which groups of players work through themes and variations, all on the same musical instrument. These compositions were introduced to new music audiences in the 1970s and ’80s and have been rarely heard since. Still, they are thrilling to witness live, as was made possible by the miraculous “That Which Is Fundamental,” an exhibition and concert series presented in Philadelphia at the Slought

  • “Back to Black—Art, Cinema and the Racial Imaginary”

    Though historical categories have formed the basis for many recent exhibitions on black art, “Back to Black” is unique in its transnational and interdisciplinary approach to the heyday of black political consciousness, namely the ’60s and ’70s. Selecting forty-five artists from the US, Britain, and the Caribbean, the curators have used their academic acumen to present a vast swath of diasporic works and concepts, from the originative (Romare Bearden) to the brilliantly blaxploitational (Melvin Van Peebles) to the perennially