Mara Hoberman

  • Thomas Fougeirol

    Thomas Fougeirol is a painter who paints as if he were printing, meaning he uses paint to take imprints of actions and objects rather than using it to represent them. Channeling another French artist, Yves Klein, who famously attached canvas to the roof of his car in order to capture the effects of wind, rain, and dirt, Fougeirol has left paintings out in the elements. Whereas the moonlike cratered surfaces of his “Tableaux de pluie” (Rain Paintings), 2010–, document natural phenomena—rain falling on wet oil paint—the artist’s most recent works chart an intimate universe: his own

  • Larissa Fassler

    Writing about “pickpockets and paranoia in France” for the New Yorker in 2014, Adam Gopnik described Paris’s Gare du Nord as a place where tourists, “looking for a week’s pleasure, mingled with travellers recently arrived from Bulgaria and Romania, looking for a job or a new life.” This same crossroads—the French capital’s oldest and, notoriously, unruliest train station—became the focus of Larissa Fassler’s attention while on a residency in Paris in 2014. Over the course of three months, the Berlin-based Canadian artist spent hundreds of hours, day and night, surveying and documenting

  • Jean-Marc Bustamante

    Having begun his artistic career well over three decades ago as a photographer, Jean-Marc Bustamante has since worked across diverse media to produce sculptures, prints, paintings, and installations. His tellingly titled series “Aperture,” 2015–, is the latest reminder that no matter what materials, tools, or processes Bustamante employs, his work remains conceptually rooted in photography.

    The nine large-format ink-jet prints on silver photographic paper that were featured in Bustamente’s recent show are based on scans of his colored-felt-tip-marker drawings. Installed in numerical order across

  • picks February 04, 2016

    Peter Shire

    Peter Shire’s current show is the result of long-distance conversations between French curator Julie Boukobza and the Los Angeles–born and –based artist. Via email and Skype, together they selected drawings and small three-dimensional works in metal, ceramics, and wood from the 1980s through 2015. The resulting miniretrospective celebrates Shire’s multifaceted oeuvre with a mix of functional design objects and decorative objets d’art.

    Nearly forty three-dimensional works are informally arranged on a large, custom-built table that leaves the viewer just barely enough space to navigate the gallery’s

  • “Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno”

    Living up to its impassioned title, “Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno” was an adulation of the American counterculture icon as a poet, artist, friend, lover, activist, archivist, muse, and inspiration. Conceived by his longtime partner, Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone, and curated by Florence Ostende, Giorno’s first-ever retrospective was an exhaustive yet intimate showcase comprising more than three hundred artworks, six hundred audible poems, and fifteen thousand archival photos and documents. It was also a tribute show featuring works by Rondinone, Angela Bulloch, Anne Collier, Verne Dawson, Judith

  • Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

    In 1977, a twelve-year-old Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster visited Marcel Duchamp’s exhibition at the newly opened Centre Pompidou. Evoking this seminal experience at the threshold to her own Pompidou survey thirty-eight years later, Gonzalez-Foerster adhered a life-size transparent photograph of Duchamp’s show to a street-facing glass wall and retrofitted the abutting exhibition space with elements of the museum’s original decor. Inside this installation, Espace 77, 2015, viewers stand on period gray carpeting amid Michel Cadestin’s President armchairs and look through ghostly images of Duchamp’s

  • interviews December 07, 2015

    Julien Prévieux

    Julien Prévieux, winner of the 2014 Marcel Duchamp prize, here discusses his current solo exhibition at Espace 315 at the Centre Pompidou in the context of the recent terrorist attacks in Paris. Focusing on a particular body of work included in the show, “Atelier de dessin - B.A.C. du 14e arrondissement de Paris” (Drawing Workshop: Anti-crime Police Officers from Paris’s Fourteenth Arrondissement), 2011–, a collaboration with Parisian police officers, Prévieux addresses the unintended political implications of this series. The exhibition is on view through February 1, 2016.

    AMONG MY WORKS

  • the 13th Biennale de Lyon

    IN HIS CATALOGUE ESSAY for “La vie moderne,” the thirteenth edition of the Biennale de Lyon, curator Ralph Rugoff points out one of modernism’s most enduring paradoxes: If the desire for rupture is, as he puts it, “the modernist gesture par excellence,” then the urge to break free from the modern era is “merely a symptom of the modernity it aspires to bury.” Modernism, in other words, is very much with us still—whether we admit it or not. Indeed, as Rugoff argues, its myriad impulses and effects continue to thread their way through contemporary culture in complex and contradictory ways. To

  • Bettina Samson

    Facing off from opposite ends of the gallery, two small wall-mounted sculptures in Bettina Samson’s recent show bookended a wide spectrum of three-dimensional works. At the entrance was the cratered, amorphous, and mottled More Honour’d in the Breach 1, 2014. The informe incarnate, this hole-riddled green-glazed earthenware object was in stark contrast to the minimalist Bauspiel, 2015, directly across the room. Titled after a Bauhaus building-block set, this orderly construction of wooden letterpress blocks resembles a miniature of a David Smith “Cubi,” 1961–65. Arrayed between these two

  • Jim Dine

    At eighty, Jim Dine still has a few tricks up his sleeve. Five recent sculptures featuring the artist’s toolbox staples—hammers, wrenches, pliers, hooks, saws, C-clamps, and so on—include a material he has rarely worked with before: glass. Souvenirs of his family’s hardware store as well as extensions of his own hands, Dine’s tools have been an autobiographical motif since the 1960s, showing up in drawings, paintings, sculptures, prints, and photographs. Literally and figuratively breathing new life into his personal iconography, Dine’s foray into glassblowing (a collaboration with

  • Florian and Michael Quistrebert

    In dialogue with a long history of painters’ attempts to represent light and harness its dematerializing effects—from Vermeer to Monet to Rothko—the latest works by Florian and Michael Quistrebert sparkle and shine, thanks to the iridescent car paints and tiny, battery-powered lightbulbs used in many of them. In contrast to the brothers’ previous muted geometric compositions, their new paintings are characterized by thick gestural strokes and flashy jewel tones. “Hyperdelia,” the first exhibition dedicated to the “Overlight” series begun in 2013, introduced this body of work with a

  • picks July 23, 2015

    Meschac Gaba

    Born in Benin and based in the Netherlands, Meschac Gaba made his first wigs following a residency in New York City. Stimulated by Manhattan’s skyline and hair-braiding salons, Gaba’s series of “Architecture Tresses,” 2005–2006, interpreted landmarks like the Chrysler Building as vertiginous synthetic hairpieces. The fourteen wigs currently on view here represent European monuments and various historical figures.

    Paris is well represented in wig form by five re-creations of iconic buildings, such as Notre-Dame de Paris, 2006, whose bell towers of woven brown braids evoke a woolly horned beast.

  • interviews June 10, 2015

    Philippe Parreno

    Paris-based artist Philippe Parreno’s installation H{N)YPN(Y}OSIS, 2015, is a fluid and infinitely variable composition of audio and visual elements that the artist can individually manipulate using an iPad. Parreno will be on site for the duration of the show, choreographing an ongoing, ever-changing dance featuring videos, sculptures, and live performances. H{N)YPN(Y}OSIS opens at the Park Avenue Armory on June 11 and will run through August 2, 2015.

    UNTIL THIS PROJECT, the tools I had at my disposal to visualize a show were basically computer programs designed for positioning objects within

  • Hervé Télémaque

    With more than seventy works borrowed primarily from French public collections, Hervé Télémaque’s recent retrospective reaffirmed the significant institutional support the Haitian-born artist has received in his adoptive country. Télémaque, who arrived in Paris via New York in 1961, has produced a body of work—paintings, sculptures, collages, drawings, and assemblages—that is as aesthetically diverse as it is thematically consistent. Chronologically tracing the development of Télémaque’s unique lexicon—a blend of island motifs, pop-culture iconography, and art-historical

  • Gyan Panchal

    Broken beehive boxes, a discarded hunting tent, a three-foot-tall wedge of eroded polyurethane: These are among the raw materials of Gyan Panchal’s latest works. Starting with man-made items scavenged from the French countryside near his home in Limousin, Panchal takes care not to efface marks made by humans, animals, chemicals or other forces of nature whose interactions with these once-functional objects predate his own. Via subtle, sometimes almost imperceptible modifications, such as the addition of a layer of dust, some gentle sanding, or a strategic fold, Panchal casts himself in the humble

  • Dora Budor

    Creepy as a scene from a sci-fi blockbuster, Dora Budor’s exhibition “The Architect’s Plan, His Contagion and Sensitive Corridors” invaded the gallery with swaths of synthetic skin, severed cyborg prostheses, and images of smoldering, wreckage-filled landscapes. In fact, it’s all “screen-used” stuff you might have seen at the movies. Budor reclaims the materiality of silicone scars, cyborg body parts, and other substances specifically designed for digital capture, manipulation, and consumption. Removed from their original contexts, these artifacts of imaginary worlds appear significantly less

  • David Malek

    Masquerading as pure abstractions, David Malek’s latest ensemble of bright and glossy acrylic paintings feature either single large shapes or allover geometric patterns. Painted in electric shades of pink, blue, green, and yellow, along with gray, black, and silver, the eight canvases that were on view simultaneously channel the detached cool of 1980s neo-geo paintings and the meditative quality of ancient Indian tantric designs. These apparent Minimalist and mystical connotations are complicated, however, by the fact that Malek’s titles connect each painting to a tangible, real-world subject.

  • picks February 16, 2015

    Emmanuel Van der Meulen

    Created in situ at Villa de Medici in Rome, Emmanuel Van der Meulen’s nearly twelve-foot-long, unstretched canvases hang from a gallery wall like mysterious scrolls. Removed from their original context, the three earth-toned geometric abstractions—part of a series comprising six paintings, entitled “Cosmica Sidera,” 2012—are now nomadic rather than site-specific, narrating their own physical, conceptual, and historical context.

    The intimate gallery setting emphasizes the monumentality of the unfurled canvases while encouraging a closer look at the painted surfaces. Environmental residues such as

  • picks February 11, 2015

    Jacin Giordano

    Testing the limits of conventional painting—both as a medium and a process—Jacin Giordano’s latest works are born of a cyclical, waste-not studio practice. The bulk of the works presented (all 2014) were made with the byproducts of an ongoing series—a single example from which, Cutpainting #52, represents the cornerstone of the show. To create his “Cutpaintings” Giordano layers thick coats of brightly colored acrylics onto wood supports, then sands, cuts, and shreds the paintings to reveal their multicolored strata. Conscious that this additive/reductive process is also potentially wasteful,

  • Daiga Grantina

    “Legal Beast Language,” the title of Daiga Grantina’s first Paris solo show, is a phrase borrowed from The Age of Wire and String, American author Ben Marcus’s 1995 field guide for an alternative universe. This cryptic glossary term is the only explicit reference to Marcus’s book, but a line from the introduction—“by looking at an object we destroy it with our desire, that for accurate vision to occur the thing must be trained to see itself”—provides a useful approach to the Latvian-born, Berlin-based artist’s latest body of work: five tantalizing amalgams of found items and crudely