Marisa Olson

  • picks May 21, 2020

    Aleksandra Domanović

    The eighteenth-century protagonist of the French romance film Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019) is commissioned to secretly paint the noblewoman who eventually becomes her lover. What unfolds is a story very much about looking, in which the pairs’ crescendoing series of exchanged glances constitute a charged model of the queer female gaze. The film is an attractive intertext for Aleksandra Domanović’s new exhibition of silk-screen prints, “Edicije.” In each of these two dozen works on paper, the classic dyad of seeing and perceiving is played out in optical illusions that interdigitate colors

  • interviews March 31, 2020

    Olia Lialina

    Pioneering Net artist Olia Lialina was one of the first to make work for networked browsers and she’s one of the few from that first wave to persist. She not only offers metacommentary on the evolving conditions of the World Wide Web, but also consistently speaks and writes about its vernacular iconography and the social conditions created by its content, protocols, and devices. Lialina maintains her own archive of Geocities pages, can recount the art history of sparkly star gifs, and is herself a noted “animated gif model.” Her current show, “Best Effort Network,” is up at arebyte Gallery,

  • interviews October 15, 2019

    Suzanne Treister

    Since the 1980s, the British artist Suzanne Treister has blended history and speculation in ways that many are moved to call hallucinatory, if not slightly paranoid. Her paintings and pioneering digital works have drawn on her interest in systems of observation and belief, from surveillance to theoretical physics. Often diagrammatic and filled with wordplay, her early pieces anticipate the technopolitics of the twenty-first century and presage postinternet-era arcana like a future-tense Hilma af Klint. On September 19, 2019, London’s Serpentine Galleries launched Treister’s augmented reality

  • picks February 14, 2017

    Haroon Mirza

    The announcement for British artist Haroon Mirza’s first Canadian solo show, “Entheogens” at first reads like an edibles review. Promising all new work, the statement includes a list of main ingredients as pseudospiritual anchoring points: a scattering of the scientific names for LSD, magic mushrooms, and peyote. The artist’s previous self-regulating installations provided an interesting context for his recent references to ethnobotany and West Coast trip culture, especially when examined by a Brit in a city with a strong First Nations artist community.

    Mirza often works with light and sound,